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Vol. 106, No. 2, 2007
Issue release date: June 2007
Section title: Paper
Nephron Clin Pract 2007;106:c72–c81
(DOI:10.1159/000101801)

Pre-Eclampsia: Clinical Manifestations and Molecular Mechanisms

Baumwell S. · Karumanchi S.A.
Departments of aMedicine and bObstetrics and Gynecology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 6/6/2007

Number of Print Pages: 1
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: (Print)
eISSN: 1660-2110 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NEC

Abstract

Preeclampsia affects 3–5% of pregnancies and can have a significant impact on health for both mother and fetus. Risk factors include maternal co-morbidities such as obesity and chronic hypertension, paternal factors, and genetic factors. New hypertension and proteinuria during the second half of pregnancy are key diagnostic criteria, but the clinical features and associated prognostic implications are somewhat heterogeneous and may reflect different mechanisms of disease. Renal dysfunction and proteinuria correspond to the pathologic finding of glomerular endotheliosis, and generally resolve after cure of preeclampsia through fetal and placenta delivery. The molecular mechanisms behind this disease are being discovered and refined. The initial etiologic agents are currently unknown. Pathologic studies show abnormal development of an ischemic placenta with a high-resistance vasculature, which cannot deliver an adequate blood supply to the fetoplacental unit. Endothelial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of the maternal syndrome. Dysfunctional endothelial cells produce altered quantities of vasoactive mediators, which lead to a tip in the balance towards vasoconstriction. An imbalance in circulating angiogenic factors is emerging as a prominent mechanism that mediates the endothelial dysfunction and the clinical signs and symptoms of preeclampsia. Soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1), an endogenous anti-angiogenic factor that is a potent vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) antagonist, is highly elevated in preeclampsia. VEGF is not only important in angiogenesis, but also in maintaining endothelial health including the formation of endothelial fenestrae (a hallmark of the glomerular vascular endothelium). sFlt1 overexpression in animals induces glomerular endotheliosis with the loss of endothelial fenestrae that resembles the renal histological lesions of preeclampsia. More severe forms of preeclampsia, including the HELLP syndrome, may be explained by a concomitant elevation in both sFlt1 and soluble endoglin, another anti-angiogenic factor. Unraveling of the molecular mechanisms behind preeclampsia may help to expand our armamentarium to treat patients in a more directed fashion, as current management consists of supportive care and expedited delivery. Finally, long-term outcomes of women with preeclampsia include a significantly increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, including mortality, which may warrant more aggressive screening and treatment in this population.


  

Author Contacts

S. Ananth Karumanchi, MD
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Renal Division, RW 663
330 Brookline Avenue
Boston, MA 02215 (USA)
Tel. +1 617 667 1018, Fax +1 617 667 2913, E-Mail sananth@bidmc.harvard.edu

  

Article Information

Published online: June 6, 2007
Number of Print Pages : 10
Number of Figures : 1, Number of Tables : 0, Number of References : 83

  

Publication Details

Nephron Clinical Practice

Vol. 106, No. 2, Year 2007 (Cover Date: June 2007)

Journal Editor: Powis, S.H. (London)
ISSN: 1660–2110 (print), 1660–2110 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NEC


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 6/6/2007

Number of Print Pages: 1
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: (Print)
eISSN: 1660-2110 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NEC


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