Cover

Sexual Dysfunction

The Brain-Body Connection

Editor(s): Balon R. (Detroit, Mich.) 
Table of Contents
Vol. 29, No. , 2008
Section title: Paper
Balon R (ed): Sexual Dysfunction. The Brain-Body Connection. Adv Psychosom Med. Basel, Karger, 2008, vol 29, pp 131-149
(DOI:10.1159/000126628)
Paper

Drugs of Abuse and Sexual Functioning

Palha A. · Esteves M.
Department of Psychiatry, Oporto Medical School, Porto, Portugal

Abstract

The use of mind-altering substances can be found in very different cultures and traced back thousands of years; the same is true for the searching of drugs that could increase sexual functioning. In this text, we explore the relation between drugs of abuse and sexuality in three domains: drugs and sexual dysfunctions, drugs and risky sexual behavior and drugs used as sexual aids. Although some drugs can increase sexual response in the early stages of the addiction career, particularly in those with a previous sexual dysfunction, the chronic use of substances tends to deteriorate all stages of sexual response in both male and female abusers. There is sufficient evidence for considering that drug use before or during sexual intercourse can, in certain circumstances, elevate the risk of unwanted pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases. Specific prevention strategies should be addressed to this population. Some psychotropic drugs are sometimes used as sexual aids. This can have some risks and should alert the therapist to a possible underlying and undiagnosed sexual problem.

Copyright / Drug Dosage

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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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