Cover

Dermatologic Immunity

Editor(s): Nickoloff B.J. (Chicago, Ill.) 
Nestle F.O. (London) 
Table of Contents
Vol. 10, No. , 2008
Section title: Paper
Nickoloff BJ, Nestle FO (eds): Dermatologic Immunity. Curr Dir Autoimmun. Basel, Karger, 2008, vol 10, pp 1-26
(DOI:10.1159/000131410)

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Gober M. · Gaspari A.
aUniversity of Maryland School of Medicine, o Department of Dermatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md., USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 5/7/2008
Cover Date: 2008

Number of Print Pages: 26
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-8055-8391-6 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-8055-8392-3 (Online)

Abstract

Allergic contact dermatitis is a classic example of a cell mediated hypersensitivity reaction in the skin. This occurs as a result of xenobiotic chemicals penetrating into the skin, chemically reacting with self proteins, eventually resulting in a hapten-specific immune response. It is precisely because of this localized immune response that allergic signs and symptoms occur (redness, edema, warmth and pruritus). It has been known for years that conventional T-cells (CD4 or CD8 T-cells that express a T-cell receptor /) are critical effectors for this reaction. There is emerging evidence that innate immune lymphocytes such as invariant Natural killer T-cells and even Natural killer cells may play important role. Other T-cell types such as Tregulatory cells and the IL-10 secreting Tregulatory cells type I are likely to be important in the control (resolution) of allergic contact dermatitis. Other cell types that may contribute include B-cells and hapten-specific IgM. Additionally, epidermal Langerhans cells have been ascribed an indispensable role as an antigen presenting cell to educate T-cells of the skin immune system. Studies of mice that lack this cell type suggest that Langerhans cells may be dispensible, and may even play a regulatory role in allergic contact dermatitis. The identity of the antigen presenting cells that complement Langerhans cells has yet to be identified. Lastly, Keratinocytes play a role in all phases of allergic contact dermatitis, from the early initiation phase with the elaboration of inflammatory cytokines, that plays a role in Langerhans cell migration, and T-cell trafficking, through the height of the inflammatory phase with direct interactions with epidermotrophic T-cells, through the resolution phase of allergic contact dermatitis with the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and tolerogenic antigen presentation to effector T-cells. As the understanding of allergic contact dermatitis continues to improve, this will provide novel therapeutic targets for immune modulating therapy.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 5/7/2008
Cover Date: 2008

Number of Print Pages: 26
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-8055-8391-6 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-8055-8392-3 (Online)


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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