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Vol. 41, No. 5, 2008
Issue release date: August 2008
Section title: Original Paper
Psychopathology 2008;41:313–321
(DOI:10.1159/000146069)

Temperament and Personality Dimensions in Suicidal and Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Inpatients

Pompili M. · Rihmer Z. · Akiskal H.S. · Innamorati M. · Iliceto P. · Akiskal K.K. · Lester D. · Narciso V. · Ferracuti S. · Tatarelli R. · De Pisa E. · Girardi P.
aDepartment of Psychiatry, Sant’Andrea Hospital, La Sapienza University of Rome, and bUniversità Europea di Roma, Rome, Italy; cDepartment of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School and International Consortium for Bipolar Disorder Research, McLean Division of Massachusetts General Hospital, Belmont, Mass., dInternational Mood Center and eSan Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center, La Jolla, Calif., and fRichard Stockton College of New Jersey, Pomona, N.J., USA; gNational Institute for Psychiatry and Neurology and Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest, Hungary

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 6/5/2007
Accepted: 10/22/2007
Published online: 7/19/2008

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PSP

Abstract

Background: Suicide is a serious public health problem. In the international literature there is evidence to support the notion that certain temperaments and personality traits are often associated with suicidal behavior. Sampling and Methods: In this study, 150 psychiatric inpatients were investigated using the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego autoquestionnaire, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, 2nd edition (MMPI-2) and the Beck Hopelessness Scale and evaluated for suicide risk by means of the critical items of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Statistical analysis, including logistic regression analysis and multiple regression analysis, showed that suicide risk contributed to the prediction of hopelessness. Among the temperaments, only the hyperthymic temperament, as a protective factor, and the dysthymic/cyclothymic/anxious temperament contributed significantly to the prediction of hopelessness. Irritable temperament and social introversion were predictive factors for suicidal risk. Hopelessness and depression were associated with higher suicidal behavior and ideation, but, unexpectedly, depression as measured by the MMPI did not contribute significantly to the multiple regressions. Conclusions: The present study indicated that, although suicidal psychiatric patients have MMPI-2 profiles in the pathological range, they exhibit several differences from nonsuicidal patients. Patients at risk of suicide have specific temperaments as well as personality and defense mechanism profiles. They are more socially introverted, depressed and psychasthenic, and use hysterical and schizoid mechanisms more often. Generalizability of the findings was limited by the small sample size and the mix of bipolar disorder I, bipolar disorder II, major depressive disorder and psychotic disorder patients.


  

Author Contacts

Maurizio Pompili, MD
Sant’Andrea Hospital, Department of Psychiatry
Via di Grottarossa 1035
IT–0189 Rome (Italy)
Tel. +39 06 3377 5675, Fax +39 06 3377 5342, E-Mail maurizio.pompili@uniroma1.it

  

Article Information

Received: June 5, 2007
Accepted after revision: October 22, 2007
Published online: July 19, 2008
Number of Print Pages : 9
Number of Figures : 0, Number of Tables : 3, Number of References : 54

  

Publication Details

Psychopathology (International Journal of Descriptive and Experimental Psychopathology, Phenomenology and Psychiatric Diagnosis)

Vol. 41, No. 5, Year 2008 (Cover Date: August 2008)

Journal Editor: Mundt C. (Heidelberg), Akiskal H.S. (San Diego, Calif.), Mezzich J.E. (New York, N.Y.)
ISSN: 0254–4962 (Print), eISSN: 1423–033X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PSP


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 6/5/2007
Accepted: 10/22/2007
Published online: 7/19/2008

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PSP


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