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Table of Contents
Vol. 1, No. 1, 2009
Issue release date: January – December
Section title: Published: July 2009

Open Access Gateway

Case Rep Neurol 2009;1:41–46
(DOI:10.1159/000226120)

Isolated Hemiataxia and Cerebellar Diaschisis after a Small Dorsolateral Medullary Infarct

Kishi M.a · Sakakibara R.a · Nagao T.b · Terada H.c · Ogawa E.a
aNeurology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, bDepartment of Neurosurgery, and cDepartment of Radiology, Sakura Medical Center, Toho University, Sakura, Japan
email Corresponding Author

Ryuji Sakakibara, MD, PhD

Neurology, Internal Medicine, Sakura Medical Center, Toho University

564-1 Shimoshizu, Sakura 285-8741 (Japan)

Tel. +81 43 462 8811, ext. 2323, Fax +81 43 487 4246E-Mail sakakibara@sakura.med.toho-u.ac.jp

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Abstract

Isolated hemiataxia after a medullary infarct is rare. We describe a case of isolated hemiataxia after a small infarct localized at the ipsilateral dorsolateral medulla. An 83-year-old man developed acute onset of ataxia in the left arm and in both legs. Speech and extraocular movement were normal, and he did not have any other neurological manifestations. Brain MRI showed a small infarct localized at the left dorsolateral medulla, which involved the inferior cerebellar peduncle. 123ECD-SPECT showed hypoperfusion in the left cerebellar hemisphere without clear vascular territory. Neuroimaging findings for our patient suggested the involvement of the inferior cerebellar peduncle that projects to the cerebellum in our patient.

© 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Published: July 2009

Published online: July 21, 2009
Issue release date: January – December

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: (Print)
eISSN: 1662-680X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRN


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