Login to MyKarger

New to MyKarger? Click here to sign up.

Login with Facebook

Forgot Password? Reset your password

Authors, Editors, Reviewers

For Manuscript Submission, Check or Review Login please go to Submission Websites List.

Submission Websites List

Institutional Login (Shibboleth)

For the academic login, please select your country in the dropdown list. You will be redirected to verify your credentials.

Journal Mobile Options
Table of Contents
Vol. 214, No. 1, 2000
Issue release date: January – February
Section title: Paper
Ophthalmologica 2000;214:86–104
(DOI:10.1159/000027475)

The Ageing Lens

Bron A.J.a · Vrensen G.F.J.M.b · Koretz J.c · Maraini G.d · Harding J.J.a
aNuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology, University of Oxford, UK; bDepartment of Morphology, Netherlands Ophthalmic Research Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; cBiology/Biophysics, Rensselaer Polytech Institute, Science Centre, Troy, N.Y., USA; and dOphthalmology, University of Parma, Italy

Do you have an account?

Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



Login Information





Contact Information










I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.



To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

CHF 38.00 *
EUR 35.00 *
USD 39.00 *

Select

KAB

Buy a Karger Article Bundle (KAB) and profit from a discount!

If you would like to redeem your KAB credit, please log in.


Save over 20% compared to the individual article price.
Learn more

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00


Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select

* The final prices may differ from the prices shown due to specifics of VAT rules.

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: February 03, 2000
Issue release date: January – February

Number of Print Pages: 19
Number of Figures: 12
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0030-3755 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0267 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/OPH

Abstract

The human lens grows by a process of epithelial cell division at its equator and the formation of generations of differentiated fibre cells. Despite the process of continuous remodelling necessary to achieve growth within a closed system, the lens can retain a high level of light transmission throughout the lifetime of the individual, with the ability to form sharp images on the retina. Continuous growth of the lens solves the problem imposed by terminal differentiation within a closed, avascular system, from which cells cannot be shed. The lens fibre tips arch over the equator to meet anteriorly and posteriorly and form branching sutures of increasing complexity. The stages of branching may create the optical zones of discontinuity seen on biomicroscopy. The lens is exposed to the cumulative effects of radiation, oxidation and postranslational modification. These later proteins and other lens molecules in such a way as to impair membrane functions and perturb protein (particularly crystallin) organisation, so that light transmission and image formation may be compromised. Damage is minimised by the presence of powerful scavenger and chaperone molecules. Progressive insolublisation of the crystallins of the lens nucleus in the first five decades of life, and the formation of higher molecular weight aggregates, may account for the decreased deformability of the lens nucleus which characterises presbyopia. Additional factors include: the progressive increase in lens mass with age, changes in the point of insertion of the lens zonules, and a shortening of the radius of curvature of the anterior surface of the lens. Also with age, there is a fall in light transmission by the lens, associated with increased light scatter, increased spectral absorption, particularly at the blue end of the spectrum, and increased lens fluorescence. A major factor responsible for the increased yellowing of the lens is the accumulation of a novel fluorogen, glutathione-3-hydroxy kynurenine glycoside, which makes a major contribution to the increasing fluorescence of the lens nucleus which occurs with age. Since this compound may also cross-link with the lens crystallins, it may contribute to the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates and the increases in light scattering which occur with age. Focal changes of microscopic size are observed in apparently transparent, aged lenses and may be regarded as precursors of cortical cataract formation.

© 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: February 03, 2000
Issue release date: January – February

Number of Print Pages: 19
Number of Figures: 12
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0030-3755 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0267 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/OPH


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.