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Table of Contents
Vol. 32, No. 3, 2010
Issue release date: August 2010
Section title: Original Paper
Free Access
Dev Neurosci 2010;32:184–196

Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Attracts Geniculate Ganglion Neurites during Embryonic Targeting

Hoshino N. · Vatterott P. · Egwiekhor A. · Rochlin M.W.
Biology Department, Loyola University Chicago, Chicago, Ill., USA
email Corresponding Author

Assoc. Prof. M. William Rochlin

Loyola University Chicago, Biology Department, LSB 317B

1032 W. Sheridan Road

Chicago, IL 60660 (USA)

Tel. +1 773 508 2450, Fax +1 773 508 3646, E-Mail wrochli@luc.edu

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Geniculate axons are initially guided to discrete epithelial placodes in the lingual and palatal epithelium that subsequently differentiate into taste buds. In vivo approaches show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA is concentrated in these placodes, that BDNF is necessary for targeting taste afferents to these placodes, and that BDNF misexpression disrupts guidance. We used an in vitro approach to determine whether BDNF may act directly on geniculate axons as a trophic factor and as an attractant, and whether there is a critical period for responsiveness to BDNF. We show that BDNF promotes neurite outgrowth from geniculate ganglion explants dissected from embryonic day (E) 15, E18, infant, and adult rats cultured in collagen gels, and that there is a concentration optimum for neurite extension. Gradients of BDNF derived from slow-release beads caused the greatest bias in neurite outgrowth at E15, when axons approach the immature gustatory papillae. Further, neurites advanced faster toward the BDNF bead than away from it, even if the average amount of neurotrophic factor encountered was the same. We also found that neurites that contact BDNF beads did not advance beyond them. At E18, when axons would be penetrating pregustatory epithelium in vivo, BDNF continued to exert a tropic effect on geniculate neurites. However, at postnatal and adult stages, the influence of BDNF was predominantly trophic. Our data support a role for BDNF acting as an attractant for geniculate axons during a critical period that encompasses initial targeting but not at later stages.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel

Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: October 13, 2009
Accepted: April 15, 2010
Published online: July 20, 2010
Issue release date: August 2010

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 4
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0378-5866 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9859 (Online)

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