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Original Paper

Open Access Gateway

An Encapsulated Fruit and Vegetable Juice Concentrate Increases Skin Microcirculation in Healthy Women

De Spirt S.a · Sies H.a, b, d · Tronnier H.c · Heinrich U.c

Author affiliations

aInstitute of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Faculty of Medicine, and bLeibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Heinrich Heine University, Düsseldorf, and cInstitute for Experimental Dermatology, University of Witten-Herdecke, Witten, Germany; dCollege of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Corresponding Author

Prof. Ulrike Heinrich

Institute for Experimental Dermatology, University of Witten-Herdecke

Alfred-Herrhausen-Strasse 44

DE–58455 Witten (Germany)

Tel. +49 230 2282 6300, E-Mail ulrike.heinrich@uni-wh.de

Related Articles for ""

Skin Pharmacol Physiol 2012;25:2–8

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Abstract

Background/Aim: Microcirculation in the dermis of the skin is important for nutrient delivery to this tissue. In this study, the effects of a micronutrient concentrate (Juice Plus+®; ‘active group’), composed primarily of fruit and vegetable juice powder, on skin microcirculation and structure were compared to placebo. Study Design/Methods: This 12-week study had a monocentric, double-blind placebo and randomized controlled design with two treatment groups consisting of 26 healthy middle-aged women each. The ‘oxygen to see’ device was used to evaluate microcirculation. Skin density and thickness were measured using ultrasound. Measurements for skin hydration (Corneometer®), transepidermal water loss and serum analysis for carotenoids and α-tocopherol were also performed. Results: By 12 weeks, microcirculation of the superficial plexus increased by 39%. Furthermore, skin hydration increased by 9% while skin thickness increased by 6% and skin density by 16% in the active group. In the placebo group, microcirculation decreased, and a slight increase in skin density was observed. Conclusion: Ingestion of a fruit- and vegetable-based concentrate increases microcirculation of the skin at 12 weeks of intervention and positively affects skin hydration, density and thickness.

© 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: February 21, 2011
Accepted: June 06, 2011
Published online: August 05, 2011
Issue release date: December 2011

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1660-5527 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-5535 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/SPP


Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.