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Vol. 35, No. 2, 2013
Issue release date: March 2013
Section title: Original Paper
Cerebrovasc Dis 2013;35:168-174
(DOI:10.1159/000346603)

Serum Uric Acid and Outcome after Acute Ischemic Stroke: PREMIER Study

Chiquete E. · Ruiz-Sandoval J.L. · Murillo-Bonilla L.M. · Arauz A. · Orozco-Valera D.R. · Ochoa-Guzmán A. · Villarreal-Careaga J. · León-Jiménez C. · Barinagarrementeria F. · Ramos-Moreno A. · Cantú-Brito C.
aDepartment of Neurology and Psychiatry, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición ‘Salvador Zubirán', Mexico City, bDepartment of Neurology, Hospital Civil de Guadalajara ‘Fray Antonio Alcalde', Guadalajara, cDepartment of Neurology, Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara, Zapopan, dStroke Clinic, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City, eDepartment of Neurology, Hospital General de Culiacán, Culiacán, fDepartment of Neurology, Hospital Regional ‘Dr. Valentín Gómez Farías', ISSSTE, Zapopan, gDepartment of Neurology, Hospital Ángeles de Querétaro, Querétaro, hMedical Research Area, Sanofi-Aventis, Mexico City, Mexico

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 7/10/2012 2:51:55 PM
Accepted: 12/18/2012
Published online: 2/22/2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CED

Abstract

Background: Current evidence shows that uric acid is a potent antioxidant whose serum concentration increases rapidly after acute ischemic stroke (AIS). Nevertheless, the re-lationship between serum uric acid (SUA) levels and AIS outcome remains debatable. We aimed to describe the prognostic significance of SUA in AIS. Methods: We studied 463 patients (52% men, mean age 68 years, 13% with glomerular filtration rate <60 ml/min at hospital arrival) with AIS pertaining to the multicenter registry PREMIER, who had SUA measurements at hospital presentation. Multivariate models were constructed to analyze the association of SUA with functional outcome as assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 30-day, 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-up. A mRS 0-1 was regarded as a very good outcome. Results: Mean SUA concentration at hospital arrival was 6.1 ± 3.7 mg/dl (362.8 ± 220.0 μmol/l). Compared with cases with higher SUA levels at hospital admission, patients with ≤4.5 mg/dl (≤267.7 μmol/l; the lowest tertile of the sample) had more cases of a very good 30-day outcome (30.5 vs. 18.9%, respectively; p = 0.004). SUA was not associated with mortality or functional dependence (mRS >2) at 30 days, or with any outcome measure at 3, 6 or 12 months poststroke. After adjustment for age, gender, stroke type and severity (NIHSS <9), time since event onset, serum creatinine, hypertension, diabetes and smoking, a SUA ≤4.5 mg/dl (≤267.7 μmol/l) was positively associated with a very good short-term outcome (odds ratio: 1.76, 95% confidence interval: 1.05-2.95; negative predictive value: 81.1%), but not at 3, 6 or 12 months of follow-up. When NIHSS was entered in the multivariate model as a continuous variable, the independent association of SUA with outcome was lost. Compared with cases with higher levels, patients with SUA ≤4.5 mg/dl (≤267.7 μmol/l) were more frequently younger than 55 years, women, with mild strokes, with normal serum creatinine and fewer had hypertension. The time since event onset to hospital arrival was not significantly associated with AIS severity or SUA levels; nevertheless, a nonsignificant tendency was observed for patients with severe strokes and high SUA levels arriving in <24 h. Conclusions: A low SUA concentration is modestly associated with a very good short-term outcome. Our findings support the hypothesis that SUA is more a marker of the magnitude of the cerebral infarction than an independent predictor of stroke outcome.


  

Author Contacts

Carlos Cantú-Brito
Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, INCMNSZ
Vasco de Quiroga 15
Tlalpan, Mexico City 14000 (Mexico)
E-Mail carloscantu_brito@hotmail.com

  

Article Information

Received: July 10, 2012
Accepted: December 18, 2012
Published online: February 22, 2013
Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 3, Number of Tables : 3, Number of References : 33

  

Publication Details

Cerebrovascular Diseases

Vol. 35, No. 2, Year 2013 (Cover Date: March 2013)

Journal Editor: Hennerici M.G. (Mannheim)
ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print), eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CED


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 7/10/2012 2:51:55 PM
Accepted: 12/18/2012
Published online: 2/22/2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CED


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