Cover

Evidence-Based Research in Pediatric Nutrition

Editor(s): Szajewska H. (Warsaw) 
Shamir R. (Petach-Tikva) 
Table of Contents
Vol. 108, 2013
Section title: Issues in Infant Feeding
Szajewska H, Shamir R (eds): Evidence-Based Research in Pediatric Nutrition. World Rev Nutr Diet. Basel, Karger, 2013, vol 108, pp 56-62
(DOI:10.1159/000351485)

Cow's Milk and Goat's Milk

Turck D.
Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Department of Pediatrics, Jeanne de Flandre Children's Hospital, Lille University Faculty of Medicine, INSERM U995, Lille, France

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Issues in Infant Feeding

Published online: 9/6/2013
Cover Date: 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISBN: 978-3-318-02456-2 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02457-9 (Online)

Abstract

Cow's milk is increasingly suggested to play a role in the development of chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders whereas goat's milk is advocated as having several health benefits. Cow's milk is a rich and cheap source of protein and calcium, and a valuable food for bone health. Despite their high content in saturated fats, consumption of full-fat dairy products does not seem to cause significant changes in cardiovascular disease risk variables. Early introduction of cow's milk is a strong negative determinant of iron status. Unmodified cow's milk does not meet nutritional requirements of infants although it is acceptable to add small volumes of cow's milk to complementary foods. Cow's milk protein allergy has a prevalence ranging from 2 to 7%, and the age of recovery is usually around 2-3 years. The evidence linking cow's milk intake to a later risk of type 1 diabetes or chronic degenerative, non-communicable disorders (obesity, metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, hypertension) is not convincing. Milk probably protects against colorectal cancer, diets high in calcium are a probable cause of prostate cancer, and there is limited evidence suggesting that high consumption of milk and dairy products increases the risk for prostate cancer. There is no evidence to support the use of a cow's milk-free diet as a primary treatment for individuals with autistic spectrum disorders. Unmodified goat's milk is not suitable for infants because of the high protein and minerals content and of a low folate content. Goat's milk has no clear nutritional advantage over cow's milk and is not less allergenic. The European Food Safety Authority recently stated that proteins from goat's milk can be suitable as a protein source for infant and follow-on formula, provided the final product complies with the compositional criteria laid down in Directive 2006/141/EC.


  

Author Contacts

Prof. Dominique Turck
Unité de gastro-entérologie, hépatologie et nutrition
Département de pédiatrie, Hôpital Jeanne de Flandre
Avenue Eugène Avinée, FR-59037 Lille Cedex (France)
E-Mail dominique.turck@chru-lille.fr

  

Article Information

Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 0, Number of Tables : 1, Number of References : 31

  

Publication Details

Book Serie: World Review of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 108, Year 2013 ISSN: 0084-2230 (Print), eISSN: 1662-3975 (Online)

For additional information:
http://www.karger.com?issn=0084-2230

Book Title: Evidence-Based Research in Pediatric Nutrition

Editor(s): Szajewska H, Shamir R (eds)

For additional information:
http://www.karger.com?issn=0084-2230&volume=108


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Issues in Infant Feeding

Published online: 9/6/2013
Cover Date: 2013

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 1

ISBN: 978-3-318-02456-2 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-02457-9 (Online)


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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