Journal Mobile Options
Table of Contents
Vol. 47, No. 3, 2014
Issue release date: April 2014
Section title: Original Paper
Psychopathology 2014;47:194-201
(DOI:10.1159/000355554)

Self-Reported Psychotic-Like Experiences Are a Poor Estimate of Clinician-Rated Attenuated and Frank Delusions and Hallucinations

Schultze-Lutter F. · Renner F. · Paruch J. · Julkowski D. · Klosterkötter J. · Ruhrmann S.
aUniversity Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland; bDepartment of Clinical Psychological Science, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands; cDepartment of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany

Do you have an account?

Register and profit from personalized services (MyKarger) Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information









I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

Register and profit from personalized services (MyKarger) Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information









I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger (new!)
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
  • Reduced rates with a PPV account
read more

Direct: USD 38.00
Account: USD 26.50

Select

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00

Select

Subscribe

  • Automatic perpetual access to all articles of the subscribed year(s)
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 12/17/2012 9:29:44 AM
Accepted: 9/10/2013 7:44:25 AM
Published online: 10/31/2013

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PSP

Abstract

Background: One reason for the decision to delay the introduction of an Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in the main text of the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders was the concern that attenuated psychotic symptoms (APS) might in fact be common features in adolescents and young adults from the general population of no psychopathological significance in themselves. This concern was based on reports of high prevalence rates of psychotic-like experiences (PLEs) in the general population and the assumption that PLEs are a good estimate of APS. Although the criterion validity of self-reported PLEs had already been studied with respect to clinician-rated psychotic symptoms and found insufficient, it had been argued that PLEs might in fact be more comparable with mild, subclinical expressions of psychotic symptoms and, therefore, with APS. The present paper is the first to specifically study this assumption. Sampling and Methods: The sample consisted of 123 persons seeking help at a service for the early detection of psychosis, of whom 54 had an at-risk mental state or psychosis, 55 had a nonpsychotic mental disorder and 14 had no full-blown mental disorder. PLEs were assessed with the Peters Delusion Inventory and the revised Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale, and psychotic symptoms and APS were assessed with the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes. Results: At a level of agreement between the presence of any PLE (in 98.4% of patients) and any APS (in 40.7%) just exceeding chance (κ = 0.022), the criterion validity of PLEs for APS was insufficient. Even if additional qualifiers (high agreement or distress, preoccupation and conviction) were considered, PLEs (in 52.8%) still tended to significantly overestimate APS, and agreement was only fair (κ = 0.340). Furthermore, the group effect on PLE prevalence was, at most, moderate (Cramer's V ≤ 0.382). Conclusions: The prevalence of APS cannot be deduced from studies of PLEs. Thus, the high population prevalence rate of PLEs does not allow the conclusion that APS are common features of no pathological significance and would lack clinical validity as an Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition. Rather, the population prevalence rate of APS has to be assumed to be largely unknown at present but is likely lower than indicated by epidemiological studies of PLEs. Therefore, dedicated studies are warranted, in which APS are assessed in a way that equates to their clinical evaluation.


  

Author Contacts

Frauke Schultze-Lutter, PhD, MPsych
University Hospital of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Research Department
Bolligenstrasse 111, Haus A
CH-3000 Bern 60 (Switzerland)
E-Mail frauke.schultze-lutter@kjp.unibe.ch

  

Article Information

Received: December 17, 2012
Accepted after revision: September 10, 2013
Published online: October 31, 2013
Number of Print Pages : 8
Number of Figures : 2, Number of Tables : 2, Number of References : 42

  

Publication Details

Psychopathology (International Journal of Descriptive and Experimental Psychopathology, Phenomenology and Psychiatric Diagnosis)

Vol. 47, No. 3, Year 2014 (Cover Date: April 2014)

Journal Editor: Herpertz S.C. (Heidelberg), Fuchs T. (Heidelberg)
ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print), eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PSP


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 12/17/2012 9:29:44 AM
Accepted: 9/10/2013 7:44:25 AM
Published online: 10/31/2013

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 0254-4962 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-033X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PSP


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.