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Vol. 60, No. 4, 2014
Issue release date: June 2014
Section title: Regenerative and Technological Section / Viewpoint
Gerontology 2014;60:366-372
(DOI:10.1159/000357565)

Brain Implants for Substituting Lost Motor Function: State of the Art and Potential Impact on the Lives of Motor-Impaired Seniors

Ramsey N.F. · Aarnoutse E.J. · Vansteensel M.J.
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Regenerative and Technological Section / Viewpoint

Received: 5/14/2013 11:22:23 AM
Accepted: 11/26/2013
Published online: 3/13/2014

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0304-324X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/GER

Abstract

Recent scientific achievements bring the concept of neural prosthetics for reinstating lost motor function closer to medical application. Current research involves severely paralyzed people under the age of 65, but implications for seniors with stroke or trauma-induced impairments are clearly on the horizon. Demographic changes will lead to a shortage of personnel to care for an increasing population of senior citizens, threatening maintenance of an acceptable level of care and urging ways for people to live longer at their home independent from personal assistance. This is particularly challenging when people suffer from disabilities such as partial paralysis after stroke or trauma, where daily personal assistance is required. For some of these people, neural prosthetics can reinstate some lost motor function and/or lost communication, thereby increasing independence and possibly quality of life. In this viewpoint article, we present the state of the art in decoding brain activity in the service of brain-computer interfacing. Although some noninvasive applications produce good results, we focus on brain implants that benefit from better quality brain signals. Fully implantable neural prostheses for home use are not available yet, but clinical trials are being prepared. More sophisticated systems are expected to follow in the years to come, with capabilities of interest for less severe paralysis. Eventually the combination of smart robotics and brain implants is expected to enable people to interact well enough with their environment to live an independent life in spite of motor disabilities.


  

Author Contacts

Prof. Nick Ramsey
Department of Neurology and Neuroscience, Brain Center Rudolf Magnus
University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100
NL-3584 CX Utrecht (The Netherlands)
E-Mail n.f.ramsey@umcutrecht.nl

  

Article Information

Received: May 14, 2013
Accepted: November 26, 2013
Published online: March 13, 2014
Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 0, Number of Tables : 0, Number of References : 41

  

Publication Details

Gerontology (International Journal of Experimental, Clinical, Behavioural and Technological Gerontology)

Vol. 60, No. 4, Year 2014 (Cover Date: June 2014)

Journal Editor: Wick G. (Innsbruck)
ISSN: 0304-324X (Print), eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/GER


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Regenerative and Technological Section / Viewpoint

Received: 5/14/2013 11:22:23 AM
Accepted: 11/26/2013
Published online: 3/13/2014

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0304-324X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/GER


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