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Vol. 174, No. 3, 2003
Issue release date: 2003
Section title: Original Paper
Cells Tissues Organs 2003;174:136–152
(DOI:10.1159/000071154)

Anatomy of the Nasal Cavity in the Chinchilla

Jurcisek J.A.a · Durbin J.E.a · Kusewitt D.F.b · Bakaletz L.O.a
aCenter for Vaccines and Immunity, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Molecular Medicine, Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health and bDepartment of Veterinary Biosciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 10/7/2002
Accepted: 2/17/2003
Published online: 6/27/2003
Issue release date: 2003

Number of Print Pages: 17
Number of Figures: 16
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CTO

Abstract

There is currently great interest worldwide in developing noninvasive methods for the delivery of vaccines for upper respiratory tract diseases, including middle ear infection (otitis media, OM). One such noninvasive approach believed to have great potential for the prevention of diseases of the airway is to deliver vaccines by the intranasal (i.n.) route. Induction of a local, mucosal immune response in the upper respiratory tract, and particularly in the nasopharynx, would be a highly efficacious approach to prevention of OM. The chinchilla is the preferred rodent host for studying OM. However, although the anatomy of the chinchilla vomeronasal organ, inner ear, middle ear and Eustachian tube have been well-studied, to date there have been no reports in the literature of a similar complete analysis of the nasopharynx and nasal cavities of the chinchilla. In order to develop a relevant animal model of i.n. delivery as a potential immunization approach for the prevention of OM and to use these models for preclinical assessments of various vaccine candidates, it was important that we better understand the anatomy of the chinchilla nasal cavities and nasopharynx. Our anatomical studies revealed that the naso- and maxilloturbinates of the chinchilla nasal cavity more closely resemble the simple turbinates found in other rodents rather than the branched or complex turbinates seen in dogs, cats, and rabbits thus facilitating the i.n. delivery of vaccine candidates. The chinchilla nasal mucosa also contains numerous lymphoid aggregates like that of other rodents. Our findings thus suggest that we will be able to deliver i.n. vaccines effectively to chinchillas and that these vaccines will likely be able to induce specific immune responses.

© 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel


  

Author Contacts

Lauren O. Bakaletz, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Molecular Medicine
Ohio State University, College of Medicine and Public Health
Columbus Children’s Research Institute, Center for Vaccines and Immunity, Rm W302
700 Children’s Drive, Columbus, OH 43205-2696 (USA)
Tel. +1 614 722 2915, Fax +1 614 722 2007, E-Mail BakaletL@pediatrics.ohio-state.edu

  

Article Information

Accepted after revision: February 17, 2003
Number of Print Pages : 17
Number of Figures : 16, Number of Tables : 0, Number of References : 86

  

Publication Details

Cells Tissues Organs (in vivo, in vitro)
Founded 1945 as Acta Anatomica

Vol. 174, No. 3, Year 2003 (Cover Date: 2003)

Formerly Acta Anatomica

Journal Editor: H.-W. Denker, Essen; A.W. English, Atlanta, Ga.
ISSN: 1422–6405 (print), 1422–6421 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/journals/cto


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: 10/7/2002
Accepted: 2/17/2003
Published online: 6/27/2003
Issue release date: 2003

Number of Print Pages: 17
Number of Figures: 16
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1422-6405 (Print)
eISSN: 1422-6421 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CTO


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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