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Vol. 87, No. 4, 2005
Issue release date: May 2005
Section title: Review
Biol Neonate 2005;87:338–344
(DOI:10.1159/000084882)

New Synthetic Surfactants: The Next Generation?

Pfister R.H. · Soll R.F.
Department of Pediatrics, University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vt., USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Published online: 6/17/2005

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NEO

Abstract

Surfactant preparations have been proven to improve clinical outcome of infants at risk for or having respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). In clinical trials, ani mal-derived surfactant preparations reduce the risk of pneumothorax and mortality when compared to non-protein-containing synthetic surfactant preparations. In part, this is thought to be due to the presence of surfactant proteins in animal-derived surfactant preparations. Four native surfactant proteins have been identified. The hydrophobic surfactant proteins B (SP-B) and C (SP-C) are tightly bound to phospholipids. These proteins have important roles in maintaining the surface tension-lowering properties of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) are extremely hydrophilic and are not retained in the preparation of any commercial animal-derived surfactant products. These proteins are thought to have a role in recycling surfactant and improving host defense. There is concern that animal-derived products may have some batch-to-batch variation regarding the levels of native pulmonary surfactant proteins. In addition, there is concern regarding the hypothetical risk of transmission of viral or unconventional infectious agents from an animal source. New surfactant preparations, composed of synthetic phospholipids and essential hydrophobic surfactant protein analogs, have been developed. These surfactant protein analogs have been produced by peptide synthesis and recombinant technology to provide a new class of synthetic surfactants that may be a suitable alternative to animal-derived surfactants. Preliminary clinical studies have shown that treatment with these novel surfactant preparations can ameliorate RDS and improve clinical outcome. Clinicians will need to further understand any differences in clinical effects between available products.


  

Author Contacts

Roger F. Soll, MD
Burgess 426, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Fletcher Allen Health Care
111 Colchester Avenue
Burlington, VT 05401 (USA)
Tel. +1 802 656 2296, Fax +1 802 656 2055, E-Mail roger.soll@vtmednet.org

  

Article Information

Published online: June 1, 2005
Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 0, Number of Tables : 0, Number of References : 42

  

Publication Details

Biology of the Neonate (Fetal and Neonatal Research)

Vol. 87, No. 4, Year 2005 (Cover Date: Released May 2005)

Journal Editor: Halliday, H.L. (Belfast)
ISSN: 0006–3126 (print), 1421–9727 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/bon


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Published online: 6/17/2005

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1661-7800 (Print)
eISSN: 1661-7819 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NEO


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