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Vol. 110, No. 1-4, 2005
Issue release date: 2005
Section title: Retrotransposable Elements and Gene Evolution
Cytogenet Genome Res 110:318–332 (2005)
(DOI:10.1159/000084964)

Human endogenous retroviruses: from infectious elements to human genes

de Parseval N. · Heidmann T.
Unité des Rétrovirus Endogènes et Eléments Rétroïdes des Eukaryotes Supérieurs, UMR 8122 CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Retrotransposable Elements and Gene Evolution

Published online: 7/21/2005
Issue release date: 2005

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Mammalian genomes contain a heavy load (42% in humans) of retroelements, which are mobile sequences requiring reverse transcription for their replicative transposition. A significant proportion of these elements is of retroviral origin, with thousands of sequences resembling the integrated form of infectious retroviruses, with two LTRs bordering internal regions homologous to the gag, prt, pol, and env genes. These elements, named endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), are most probably the proviral remnants of ancestral germ-line infections by active retroviruses, which have thereafter been transmitted in a Mendelian manner. The complete sequencing of the human genome now allows a comprehensive survey of human ERVs (HERVs), which can be grouped according to sequence homologies into approximately 80 distinct families, each containing a few to several hundred elements. As reviewed here, strong similarities between HERVs and present-day retroviruses can be inferred from phylogenetic analyses on the reverse transcriptase (RT) domain of the pol gene or the transmembrane subunit (TM) of the env gene, which disclose interspersion of both classes of elements and suggest a common history and shared ancestors. Similarities are also observed at the functional levels, since despite the fact that most HERVs have accumulated mutations, deletions, and/or truncations, several elements still possess some of the functions of retroviruses, with evidence for viral-like particle formation, and occurrence of envelope proteins allowing cell-cell fusion and even conferring infectivity to pseudotypes. Along this line, a genomewide screening for human retroviral genes with coding capacity has revealed 16 fully coding envelope genes. These genes are transcribed in several healthy tissues including the placenta, three of them at a very high level. Besides their impact in modelling the genome, HERVs thus appear to contain still active genes, which most probably have been subverted by the host for its benefit and should be considered as bona fide human genes. Some of their characteristic features and possible physiological roles, as well as potential pathological effects inherited from their retroviral ancestors are also reviewed.   

© 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel


  

Author Contacts

Request reprints from Thierry Heidmann, Unité des Rétrovirus Endogènes et
Eléments Rétroïdes des Eukaryotes Supérieurs
UMR 8122 CNRS, Institut Gustave Roussy
39 rue Camille Desmoulins, FR–94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)
telephone: 33 1-42-11-49-70; fax: 33 1-42-11-53-42, e-mail: heidmann@igr.fr

  

Article Information

Supported by the CNRS and the Ligue Nationale Contre le Cancer.

Manuscript received 5 December 2003;
accepted in revised form for publication by J.-N. Volff February 2004.
Number of Print Pages : 15
Number of Figures : 5, Number of Tables : 3, Number of References : 75

  

Publication Details

Cytogenetic and Genome Research

Vol. 110, No. 1-4, Year 2005 (Cover Date: 2005)

Journal Editor: H.P. Klinger, Bronx, N.Y.; M. Schmid, Würzburg
ISSN: 1424–8581 (print), 1424–859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/cgr


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Retrotransposable Elements and Gene Evolution

Published online: 7/21/2005
Issue release date: 2005

Number of Print Pages: 15
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR


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