Journal Mobile Options
Table of Contents
Vol. 113, No. 1-4, 2006
Issue release date: March 2006
Section title: Human Disease
Cytogenet Genome Res 113:279–291 (2006)
(DOI:10.1159/000090843)

Regulation of growth and metabolism by imprinted genes

Smith F.M. · Garfield A.S. · Ward A.
Centre for Regenerative Medicine and Developmental Biology Programme, University of Bath, Department of Biology and Biochemistry, Bath (UK)

Do you have an account?

Register and profit from personalized services (MyKarger) Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information









I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

Register and profit from personalized services (MyKarger) Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information









I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger (new!)
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
  • Reduced rates with a PPV account
read more

Direct: USD 38.00
Account: USD 26.50

Select

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00

Select

Subscribe

  • Access to all articles of the subscribed year(s) guaranteed for 5 years
  • Unlimited re-access via Subscriber Login or MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
read more

Subcription rates


Select


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Human Disease

Published online: 3/30/2006
Issue release date: March 2006

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

A small sub-set of mammalian genes are subject to regulation by genomic imprinting such that only one parental allele is active in at least some sites of expression. Imprinted genes have diverse functions, notably including the regulation of growth. Much attention has been devoted to the insulin-like growth factor signalling pathway that has a major influence on fetal size and contains two components encoded by the oppositely imprinted genes, Igf2 (a growth promoting factor expressed from the paternal allele) and Igf2r (a growth inhibitory factor expressed from the maternal allele). These genes fit the parent-offspring conflict hypothesis for the evolution of genomic imprinting. Accumulated evidence indicates that at least one other fetal growth pathway exists that has also fallen under the influence of imprinting. It is clear that not all components of growth regulatory pathways are encoded by imprinted genes and instead it may be that within a pathway the influence of a single gene by each of the parental genomes may be sufficient for parent-offspring conflict to be enacted. A number of imprinted genes have been found to influence energy homeostasis and some, including Igf2 and Grb10, may coordinate growth with glucose-regulated metabolism. Since perturbation of fetal growth can be correlated with metabolic disorders in adulthood these imprinted genes are considered as candidates for involvement in this phenomenon of fetal programming.

© 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel


  

Author Contacts

Request reprints from Andrew Ward
Centre for Regenerative Medicine and Developmental Biology Programme
University of Bath, Department of Biology and Biochemistry
Building 4 South, Bath, BA2 7AY (UK)
telephone: +44 1225 386407; fax: +44 1225 386779
e-mail: bssaw@bath.ac.uk

  

Article Information

Supported by the Medical Research Council, BBSRC and Wellcome Trust.

Manuscript received: 6 June 2005
Accepted in revised form for publication by H. Sasaki,: 21 July 2005.
Number of Print Pages : 13
Number of Figures : 1, Number of Tables : 3, Number of References : 117

  

Publication Details

Cytogenetic and Genome Research

Vol. 113, No. 1-4, Year 2006 (Cover Date: March 2006)

Journal Editor: Schmid, M. (Würzburg)
ISSN: 1424–8581 (print), 1424–859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Human Disease

Published online: 3/30/2006
Issue release date: March 2006

Number of Print Pages: 13
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.