Cover

Biofunctional Textiles and the Skin

Editor(s): Hipler U.-C. (Jena) 
Elsner P. (Jena) 
Table of Contents
Vol. 33, No. , 2006
Section title: Interactions between Skin and Biofunctional Metals
Hipler U.-C., Elsner P (eds): Biofunctional Textiles and the Skin. Curr Probl Dermatol. Basel, Karger, 2006, vol 33, pp 17-34
(DOI:10.1159/000093928)

Silver in Health Care: Antimicrobial Effects and Safety in Use

Lansdown A.
Imperial College Faculty of Medicine, Charing Cross Hospital, London, UK

Do you have an account?

Register and profit from personalized services (MyKarger) Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information









I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

Register and profit from personalized services (MyKarger) Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information









I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Buy

  • FullText & PDF
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger (new!)
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restrictions for personal use
  • Reduced rates with a PPV account
read more

Direct: USD 28.00
Account: USD 19.50

Select

Rent/Cloud

  • Rent for 48h to view
  • Buy Cloud Access for unlimited viewing via different devices
  • Synchronizing in the ReadCube Cloud
  • Printing and saving restrictions apply

Rental: USD 8.50
Cloud: USD 20.00

Select

Complete book

  • Immediate access to all parts of this book
  • Cover-to-cover formats may be available
  • Unlimited re-access via MyKarger
  • Unrestricted printing, no saving restriction for personal use
read more

Pricing depends on hard-cover price


Select


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Interactions between Skin and Biofunctional Metals

Published online: 6/9/2006
Cover Date: 2006

Number of Print Pages: 18
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-8055-8121-9 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-01349-8 (Online)

Abstract

Silver has a long and intriguing history as an antibiotic in human health care. It has been developed for use in water purification, wound care, bone prostheses, reconstructive orthopaedic surgery, cardiac devices, catheters and surgical appliances. Advancing biotechnology has enabled incorporation of ionizable silver into fabrics for clinical use to reduce the risk of nosocomial infections and for personal hygiene. The antimicrobial action of silver or silver compounds is proportional to the bioactive silver ion (Ag+) released and its availability to interact with bacterial or fungal cell membranes. Silver metal and inorganic silver compounds ionize in the presence of water, body fluids or tissue exudates. The silver ion is biologically active and readily interacts with proteins, amino acid residues, free anions and receptors on mammalian and eukaryotic cell membranes. Bacterial (and probably fungal) sensitivity to silver is genetically determined and relates to the levels of intracellular silver uptake and its ability to interact and irreversibly denature key enzyme systems. Silver exhibits low toxicity in the human body, and minimal risk is expected due to clinical exposure by inhalation, ingestion, dermal application or through the urological or haematogenous route. Chronic ingestion or inhalation of silver preparations (especially colloidal silver) can lead to deposition of silver metal/silver sulphide particles in the skin (argyria), eye (argyrosis) and other organs. These are not life-threatening conditions but cosmetically undesirable. Silver is absorbed into the human body and enters the systemic circulation as a protein complex to be eliminated by the liver and kidneys. Silver metabolism is modulated by induction and binding to metallothioneins. This complex mitigates the cellular toxicity of silver and contributes to tissue repair. Silver allergy is a known contra-indication for using silver in medical devices or antibiotic textiles.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Interactions between Skin and Biofunctional Metals

Published online: 6/9/2006
Cover Date: 2006

Number of Print Pages: 18
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 0

ISBN: 978-3-8055-8121-9 (Print)
eISBN: 978-3-318-01349-8 (Online)


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.