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Vol. 118, No. 2-4, 2007
Issue release date: November 2007
Section title: Paper
Cytogenet Genome Res 118:252–259 (2007)
(DOI:10.1159/000108308)

MicroRNAs in carcinogenesis

Hagan J.P. · Croce C.M.
Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University Medical Center, Columbus, OH (USA)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 11/22/2007

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

MicroRNAs are an abundant class of noncoding RNAs, typically 20–23 nucleotides in length that are often evolutionarily conserved in metazoans and expressed in a cell and tissue specific manner. MicroRNAs exert their gene regulatory activity primarily by imperfectly base pairing to the 3′ UTR of their target mRNAs, leading to mRNA degradation or translational inhibition. In cancer, microRNAs are often dysregulated with their expression patterns being correlated with clinically relevant tumor characteristics. Recently, microRNAs were shown to be directly involved in cancer initiation and progression. This review focuses primarily on emerging developments in the microRNA field that impact our understanding of how these molecules contribute to carcinogenesis.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 11/22/2007

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CGR


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

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