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Vol. 25, No. 1-2, 2008
Issue release date: February 2008

Risk of Fractures after Stroke

Brown D.L. · Morgenstern L.B. · Majersik J.J. · Kleerekoper M. · Lisabeth L.D.
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Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the risk of fractures after stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) in relatively young patients. Methods: Administrative claims data were identified for patients aged 18 years and older hospitalized for stroke/TIA from 1997 to 2005 using ICD-9 codes. Fractures after stroke/TIA were identified for the same time period. Results: The median age was 56 years. Females represented 47%. There were 411 ischemic strokes, 195 TIAs and 36 intracerebral hemorrhages, as well as 46 fractures in 41 individuals. The risk of fracture after stroke/TIA was 1.2% at 30 days and 3.1% at 1 year. There was no significant difference in survival free from fracture between ischemic stroke and TIA cases (p = 0.8489). Conclusions: Patients with stroke/TIA, including men and younger patients, appear to be at risk for bone fractures.



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