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Vol. 5, No. 3-4, 2008
Issue release date: March 2008
Section title: Other, Miscellaneous
Free Access
Neurodegenerative Dis 2008;5:250–253
(DOI:10.1159/000113716)

Seeding Neuritic Plaques from the Distance: A Possible Role for Brainstem Neurons in the Development of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

Muresan Z. · Muresan V.
Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Jersey Medical School, Newark, N.J., USA
email Corresponding Author

Zoia Muresan

Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey – New Jersey Medical School, 185 South Orange Avenue, MSB, I-665

Newark, NJ 07103 (USA)

Tel. +1 973 972 4385, Fax +1 973 972 7950, E-Mail muresazo@umdnj.edu


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