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Vol. 3, No. 1, 2008
Issue release date: March 2008
Free Access
Breast Care 2008;3:10–16
(DOI:10.1159/000114409)

Breast Cancer in Countries of Limited Resources

Kantelhardt E.J.a · Hanson C.b · Albert U.c · Wacker J.d
a Universitätsfrauenklinik der Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, bDeutsche Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit (GTZ), Eschborn, c Frauenheilkunde und Geburtshilfe, Universitätsklinikum der Philips-Universität Marburg, dFrauenklinik, Fürst-Stirum-Klinik Bruchsal, Germany
email Corresponding Author

Abstract

For 2010, the annual incidence of breast cancer is estimated to increase from now 1.15 Mio to 1.5 Mio new cases per year. The increase is mainly seen in low and middle income countries. Resource limitations in means of finance, personnel, infrastructure, and by political instability are tremendous. Currently, little attention is paid to breast care in low-resource settings due to other health priorities. However, with increasing life expectancy and reduction of mortality due to infectious diseases, more people are confronted with non-communicable diseases, and the topic of cancer in developing countries will emerge more and more. Specific guidelines for breast cancer were given by the Global Breast Health Initiative differentiating according to available resources in different settings. From awareness in public and health care facilities to obtaining the diagnosis, deciding on strategies of treatment, and putting strategies into practice – all these obstacles differ substantially in developed and developing countries. Further research is essential to meet the challenge of breast cancer worldwide in the coming years.


 Outline


 goto top of outline Key Words

  • Breast Cancer
  • Developing countries
  • Global guidelines
  • Global Breast Health Initiative

 goto top of outline Summary

For 2010, the annual incidence of breast cancer is estimated to increase from now 1.15 Mio to 1.5 Mio new cases per year. The increase is mainly seen in low and middle income countries. Resource limitations in means of finance, personnel, infrastructure, and by political instability are tremendous. Currently, little attention is paid to breast care in low-resource settings due to other health priorities. However, with increasing life expectancy and reduction of mortality due to infectious diseases, more people are confronted with non-communicable diseases, and the topic of cancer in developing countries will emerge more and more. Specific guidelines for breast cancer were given by the Global Breast Health Initiative differentiating according to available resources in different settings. From awareness in public and health care facilities to obtaining the diagnosis, deciding on strategies of treatment, and putting strategies into practice – all these obstacles differ substantially in developed and developing countries. Further research is essential to meet the challenge of breast cancer worldwide in the coming years.

Copyright © 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel


goto top of outline Introduction


 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Dr. med. Eva Kantelhardt, Universitätsfrauenklinik Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle, Germany, Tel. +49 345557-1847, Fax -1501, E-mail eva.kantelhardt@medizin.uni-halle.de


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: February 22, 2008
Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 2, Number of Tables : 3, Number of References : 33


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Breast Care (Multidisciplinary Journal for Research, Diagnosis and Therapy)

Vol. 3, No. 1, Year 2008 (Cover Date: March 2008)

Journal Editor: Harbeck N. (München), Jakesz R. (Wien), Thomssen C. (Halle/Saale)
ISSN: 1661–3791 (Print), eISSN: 1661–3805 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/BRC


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

Abstract

For 2010, the annual incidence of breast cancer is estimated to increase from now 1.15 Mio to 1.5 Mio new cases per year. The increase is mainly seen in low and middle income countries. Resource limitations in means of finance, personnel, infrastructure, and by political instability are tremendous. Currently, little attention is paid to breast care in low-resource settings due to other health priorities. However, with increasing life expectancy and reduction of mortality due to infectious diseases, more people are confronted with non-communicable diseases, and the topic of cancer in developing countries will emerge more and more. Specific guidelines for breast cancer were given by the Global Breast Health Initiative differentiating according to available resources in different settings. From awareness in public and health care facilities to obtaining the diagnosis, deciding on strategies of treatment, and putting strategies into practice – all these obstacles differ substantially in developed and developing countries. Further research is essential to meet the challenge of breast cancer worldwide in the coming years.



 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Dr. med. Eva Kantelhardt, Universitätsfrauenklinik Ernst-Grube-Str. 40, 06120 Halle, Germany, Tel. +49 345557-1847, Fax -1501, E-mail eva.kantelhardt@medizin.uni-halle.de


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: February 22, 2008
Number of Print Pages : 7
Number of Figures : 2, Number of Tables : 3, Number of References : 33


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Breast Care (Multidisciplinary Journal for Research, Diagnosis and Therapy)

Vol. 3, No. 1, Year 2008 (Cover Date: March 2008)

Journal Editor: Harbeck N. (München), Jakesz R. (Wien), Thomssen C. (Halle/Saale)
ISSN: 1661–3791 (Print), eISSN: 1661–3805 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/BRC


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.