Journal Mobile Options
Table of Contents
Vol. 30, No. 4, 2008
Issue release date: June 2008
Neuroepidemiology 2008;30:234–238
(DOI:10.1159/000128103)

Vascular Disease among Hospitalized Multiple Sclerosis Patients

Allen N.B. · Lichtman J.H. · Cohen H.W. · Fang J. · Brass L.M. · Alderman M.H.
aSection of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, and bDepartment of Neurology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., cDepartment of Epidemiology and Population Health, and dSection of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein School of Medicine, Bronx, N.Y., USA

Individual Users: Register with Karger Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Abstract

Background: We examined the prevalence of cardiac and cerebrovascular disease among hospitalized patients with and without multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: This study used the Statewide Planning and Research Cooperate System data set of over 15 million hospitalizations in New York City from 1988 through 2002. We identified MS patients 40–84 years of age who were hospitalized for reasons other than MS or related complications. MS patients were matched 1:2 on age, gender, race/ethnicity, and insurance. Outcomes included a principal discharge diagnosis of ischemic heart disease [International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) 410–414], myocardial infarction (ICD-9 410), and ischemic stroke (ICD-9 434, 436). Multivariate logistic regression was used to compare vascular disease outcomes in MS and non-MS patients controlling for demographic and clinical factors. Results: Our studyincluded 9,949 hospitalizations among MS patients and 19,898 hospitalizations for matched non-MS controls. MS patients were less likely to be hospitalized for ischemic heart disease (OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.51–0.66) or myocardial infarction (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.64–0.96), but more likely to be hospitalized for ischemic stroke (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.33–2.09) than matched non-MS controls. Conclusion: MS patients have decreased rates of hospital admission for ischemic heart disease and myocardial infarction, but increased rates of hospitalization for ischemic stroke as compared to the general non-MS population.



Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

References

  1. Toncev G, Milicic B, Toncev S, Samardzic G: Serum uric acid levels in multiple sclerosis patients correlate with activity of disease and blood-brain barrier dysfunction. Eur J Neurol 2002;9:221–226.
  2. Rentzos M, Nikolaou C, Anagnostouli M, Rombos A, Tsakanikas K, Economou M, Dimitrakopoulos A, Karouli M, Vassilopoulos D: Serum uric acid and multiple sclerosis. Clin Neurol Neurosurg 2006;108:527–531.
  3. Johnson RJ, Kang DH, Feig D, Kivlighn S, Kanellis J, Watanabe S, Tuttle KR, Rodriguez-Iturbe B, Herrera-Acosta J, Mazzali M: Is there a pathogenetic role for uric acid in hypertension and cardiovascular and renal disease? Hypertension 2003;41:1183–1190.
  4. Fang J, Alderman MH: Serum uric acid and cardiovascular mortality: the NHANES I epidemiologic follow-up study, 1971–1992. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. JAMA 2000;283:2404–2410.
  5. Bos MJ, Koudstaal PJ, Hofman A, Witteman JC, Breteler MM: Uric acid is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke: the Rotterdam study. Stroke 2006:37:1503–1507.
  6. Fleming ST, Blake RL Jr: Patterns of comorbidity in elderly patients with multiple sclerosis. J Clin Epidemiol 1994;47:1127–1132.
  7. Sundström J, Sullivan L, D’Agostino RB, Levy D, Kannel WB, Vasan RS: Relations of serum uric acid to longitudinal blood pressure tracking and hypertension incidence. Hypertension 2005:45:28–33.
  8. Chu NF, Wang DJ, Liou SH, Shieh SM: Relationship between hyperuricemia and other cardiovascular disease risk factors among adult males in Taiwan. Eur J Epidemiol 2000;16:13–17.
  9. Dehghan A, van Hoek M, Sijbrands EJ, Hofman A, Witteman JC: High serum uric acid as a novel risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2008;31:361–362.
  10. Rathmann W, Funkhouser E, Dyer AR, Roseman JM: Relations of hyperuricemia with the various components of the insulin resistance syndrome in young black and white adults: the CARDIA study. Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults. Ann Epidemiol 1998;8:250–261.
  11. Birman-Deych E, Waterman AD, Yan Y, Nilasena DS, Radford MJ, Gage BF: Accuracy of ICD-9-CM codes for identifying cardiovascular and stroke risk factors. Med Care 2005;43:480–485.
  12. Fisher ES, Whaley FS, Krushat WM, Malenka DJ, Fleming C, Baron JA, Hsia DC: The accuracy of Medicare’s hospital claims data: progress has been made, but problems remain. Am J Public Health 1992;82:243–248.
  13. Goldstein LB: Accuracy of ICD-9-CM coding for the identification of patients with acute ischemic stroke: effect of modifier codes. Stroke 1998;29:1602–1604.


Pay-per-View Options
Direct payment This item at the regular price: USD 38.00
Payment from account With a Karger Pay-per-View account (down payment USD 150) you profit from a special rate for this and other single items.
This item at the discounted price: USD 26.50