Journal Mobile Options
Table of Contents
Vol. 18, No. 2, 1998
Issue release date: March–April 1998

Cancer in End-Stage Renal Disease: Potential Factors Involved

Vamvakas S. · Bahner U. · Heidland A.
To view the fulltext, log in and/or choose pay-per-view option

Individual Users: Register with Karger Login Information

Please create your User ID & Password





Contact Information











I have read the Karger Terms and Conditions and agree.

To view the fulltext, please log in

To view the pdf, please log in

Abstract

Increased incidence of cancer at various sites is observed in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). In particular, lymphomas and carcinomas of the kidney, prostate, liver and uterus show an enhanced prevalence in these subjects compared with the general population. A multitude of factors directly or indirectly associated with the renal disease and the treatment regimens may contribute to the increased tumor formation in these patients. Impaired function of the immune system and of DNA repair mechanisms as well as reduced antioxidant defense, accumulation of carcinogenic compounds partly due to reduced renal elimination as well as chronic infections and inflammations are found more frequently in patients with ESRD compared with the general population and may act in concert to accelerate malignant transformation and tumor formation.



Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

References

  1. Matas AJ, Simmons RL, Kjellstrand CM, Buselmeier TJ, Najarian JS: Increased incidence of malignancy during chronic renal failure. Lancet 1975;i:883–886.
  2. Giacchino F, Formica M, Quarello F, Bonello F, Piccoli G: High incidence of cancer in uremic patients. Clin Nephrol 1983;22:265–266.
  3. Inamoto H, Ozaki R, Matsuzaki T, Wakui M, Saruta T, Osawa A: Incidence and mortality patterns of malignancy and factors affecting the risk of malignancy in dialysis patients. Nephron 1991;59:611–617.
  4. Iseki K, Osawa A, Fukiyama K: Evidence for increased cancer deaths in chronic dialysis patients. Am J Kidney Dis 1993;22:308–313.
  5. Marple JT, MacDougall M: Development of malignancy in the end-stage renal disease patient. Semin Nephrol 1993;13:306–314.
  6. Port FK, Ragheb NE, Schwartz AG, Hawthorne VM: Neoplasms in dialysis patients: A population-based study. Am J Kidney Dis 1989;14(2):119–123.
  7. Ishikawa I: Renal cell carcinoma in chronic hemodialysis patients – A 1990 questionnaire study in Japan. Kidney Int 1993;41:S167–S169.
  8. Levine E: Renal cell carcinoma in uremic acquired renal cystic disease: Incidence, detection, and management. Urol Radiol 1992;13:203–210.
  9. Dunnill MS, Millard PR, Oliver D: Acquired cystic disease of the kidneys: A hazard of long term intermittent maintenance haemodialysis. J Clin Pathol 1977;30:868–877.

    External Resources

  10. Mickisch O, Bommer J, Bachmann S, Waldherr R, Mann JFE, Ritz E: Multicystic transformation of kidneys in chronic renal failure. Nephron 1984;38:93–99.
  11. Noronha IL, Ritz E, Waldherr R, Stein G, Fassbinder W: Renal cell carcinoma in dialysis patients with acquired renal cysts. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1989;4:763–769.

    External Resources

  12. Grantham JJ: Fluid selection, cellular proliferation, and the pathogenesis of renal epithelial cysts. J Am Soc Nephrol 1993;3:1843–1857.
  13. Marple JT, MacDougall M, Chonko AM: Renal cancer complicating acquired cystic kidney disease [comments]. J Am Soc Nephrol 1994;4:1951–1956.
  14. Roberts PF: Bilateral renal carcinoma associated with polycystic kidneys. Br Med J 1973;3:273–274.

    External Resources

  15. Grantham JJ: Polycystic kidney disease: Neoplasia in disguise. Am J Kidney Dis 1990;15(2):110–116.
  16. Neumann HP, Lips CJ, Hsia YE, Zbar B: Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome. Brain Pathol 1995;5:181–193.
  17. Bengtsson U, Anerwell L, Ekman L, Lehmann L: Transitional cell tumors of the renal pelvis in analgetic abusers. Scand J Urol Nephrol 1968;2:145–150.
  18. Lornoy W, Becaus I, Morell V: A new complication in analgesic nephropathy: The development of a renal cell carcinoma. Kidney Int 1986;30:641–647.
  19. Thon WF, Kliem V, Truss MC, Anton P, Kuczyk M, Stief CG, Brunkhorst R: De novo urothelial carcinoma of the upper and lower urinary tract in kidney transplant patients with end-stage analgesic nephropathy. World J Urol 1995;13:254–261.
  20. Sattler TA, Dimitrov T: Relation between Balkan nephropathy and urinary tract tumors. Lancet 1977;1:278–280.

    External Resources

  21. Goldblum SE, Reed WP: Host defences and immunologic alterations associated with chronic hemodialysis. Ann Intern Med 1980;93:579–613.
  22. Schollmeyer P, Bozkurt F: The immune system of the uremic patient: Hemodialysis vs CAPD. Clin Nephrol 1988;30(suppl):37–40.
  23. Alexiewicz JM, Gaciong Z, Klinger M, Linker-Israeli M, Pitts TO, Massry SG: Evidence of impaired T cell function in hemodialysis patients: Potential role for secondary hyperparathyroidism. Am J Nephrol 1990;10:495–501.
  24. Hoy WE, Cestero RV, Freeman RB: Deficiency of B and T lymphocytes in uremic subjects and partial improvement with maintenance hemodialysis. Nephron 1978;20:182–188.

    External Resources

  25. Köhler H, Arnold W, Renschin G, Dormeyer HH, Meyer zum Büschenfelde KH: Active hepatitis B vaccination of dialysis patients and medical staff. Kidney Int 1984;25:124–128.
  26. Massry SG, Alexiewicz JM, Gaciong Z, Klinger M: Secondary hyperparathyroidism and the immune system in chronic renal failure. Semin Oncol 1991;11:186–201.
  27. Gerez L, Madar L, Shkolnik T, Kristal B, Arad G, Reshef A, Steinberger A, Ketzinel M, Sayar D, Shasha S, Kaempfer R: Regulation of interleukin-2 and interferon-gamma gene expression in renal failure. Kidney Int 1991;40:266–272.
  28. Ames BN, Shigenaga MK, Hagen T: Oxidants, antioxidants, and the degenerative diseases of aging. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1993;90:1915–1922.
  29. Avissar N, Ornt DB, Yagil Y, Horowitz S, Watkins RH, Kerl EA, Takahashi K, Palmer IS, Cohen HJ: Human kidney proximal tubules are the main source of plasma glutathione peroxidase. Am J Physiol 1994;266:C367–C375.

    External Resources

  30. Yoshimura S, Suemizu H, Nomoto Y, Sakai H, Katsuoka Y, Kawamura N, Moriuchi T: Plasma glutathione peroxidase deficiency caused by renal dysfunction. Nephron 1996;73:207–211.
  31. Kallistratos G, Evangelou A, Seferiadi K, Vezyraki P, Barboutis K: Selenium and hemodialysis: Serum selenium levels in healthy persons, non-cancer and cancer patients with chronic renal failure. Nephron 1985;41:217–222.

    External Resources

  32. Bonomini M, Albertazzi A: Selenium in uremia. Artif Organs 1995;19:443–448.
  33. Bonomini M, Forster S, De-Risio F, Rychly J, Nebe B, Manfrini V, Klinkmann H, Albertazzi A: Effects of selenium supplementation on immune parameters in chronic uraemic patients on haemodialysis. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1995;10:1654–1661.

    External Resources

  34. Lange JH: Reanalysis of epidemiological data for selenium anti-cancer activity. Toxicol Ind Health 1991;7:319–325.
  35. Griffin AC: Role of selenium in the chemoprevention of cancer. Adv Cancer Res 1979;29:419–422.

    External Resources

  36. Yu SY, Zhu YJ, Li WG, Huang QS, Huang CZ, Zhang QN, Hou C: A preliminary report on the intervention trials of primary liver cancer in high-risk populations with nutritional supplementation of selenium in China. Biol Trace Elem Res 1991;29:289–294.
  37. Ip C, Ganther HE: Comparison of selenium and sulfur analogs in cancer prevention. Carcinogenesis 1992;13:1167–1170.
  38. Mimic-Oka J, Simic T, Ekmescic V, Dragicevic P: Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in different stages of chronic renal failure. Clin Nephrol 1995;44(1):44–48.
  39. Stein G, Schön S, Sperschneider H, Richter R, Fünfstück R, Günther K: Vitamin status in patients with chronic renal failure. Contrib Nephrol. Basel, Karger, 1988, vol 65, pp 33–36.
  40. Block G, Patterson B, Subar A: Fruit, vegetables, and cancer prevention: A review of the epidemiological evidence. Nutr Cancer 1992;18:1–29.
  41. Gilmour ER, Hartley GH, Goodship THJ: Trace elements and vitamins in renal disease; in Mitch WE, Klahr S (eds): Nutrition and the Kidney. Boston, Little, Brown, 1993, pp 114–131.
  42. Triolo L, Lippa S, Oradei A, De-Sole P, Mori R: Serum coenzyme Q10 in uremic patients on chronic hemodialysis. Nephron 1994;66:153–156.
  43. Roselaar SE, Nazhat NB, Winyard PG, Jones P, Cunningham J, Blake DR: Detection of uremic plasma by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Kidney Int 1995;48(1):199–206.
  44. Kaplan L, Katz A, Ben-Isaac C, Massry S: Malignant neoplasms and parathyroid adenoma. Cancer 1971;28:401–407.

    External Resources

  45. Koppler JD, Massry SG: Is there an association between neoplasia and primary or secondary hyperparathyroidism? Am J Nephrol 1988;8:437–448.

    External Resources

  46. Perris A, MacManus J, Whitfield J, Weiss L: Parathyroid glands and mitotic stimulation in rat bone marrow after hemorrhage. Am J Physiol 1971;220:773–778.

    External Resources

  47. Koeffler H, Amatruda T, Ikekawa N, Kobayashi Y, De Luca H: Induction of macrophage differentiation of human normal and leukemic myeloid stem cells by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and its fluorinated analogues. Cancer Res 1984;44:5624–5628.
  48. Cohen SM, Ellwein LB: Genetic errors, cell proliferation, and carcinogenesis. Cancer Res 1991;51:6493–6505.

    External Resources

  49. Cohen SM: Role of cell proliferation in regenerative and neoplastic disease. Toxicol Lett 1995;82/83:15–21.
  50. Colombo M, de-Franchis R, Del-Ninno E, Sangiovanni A, De-Fazio C, Tommasini M, Donato MF, Piva A, Di-Carlo V, Dioguardi N: Hepatocellular carcinoma in Italian patients with cirrhosis [comments]. N Engl J Med 1991;325:675–680.
  51. Fabrizi F, Lunghi G, Guarnori I, Raffaele L, Crepaldi M, Pagano A, Locatelli F: Incidence of seroconversion for hepatitis C virus in chronic haemodialysis patients: A prospective study. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1994;9:1611–1615.
  52. Fabrizi F, Marcelli D, Bacchini G, Guarnori I, Erba G, Locatelli F: Antibodies to hepatitis C virus (HCV) in chronic renal failure (CRF) patients on conservative therapy: Prevalence, risk factors and relationship to liver disease. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1994;9:780–784.
  53. Fabrizi F, Lunghi G, Marai P, Marcelli D, Guarnori I, Raffaele L, Erba G, Pagano A, Locatelli F: Virological and histological features of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in kidney transplant recipients. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1996;11(1):159–164.
  54. Uematsu T, Hanada S, Saito T, Otsuka M, Kamidori K, Osaki K, Ueda H, Harade R, Hashimoto S: Adult T cell leukemia in hemodialysis patients from the Kagoshima district, an area, in which human T cell leukemia virus type I is highly endemic. Nephron 1989;51:257–260.

    External Resources

  55. Talley NJ, Zinsmeister AR, Weaver A: Gastric adenocarcinoma and Helicobacter pylori infection. J Natl Cancer Inst 1991;83:1734–1739.
  56. Penn I: The changing pattern of posttransplant malignancies. Transplant Proc 1991;23(1):1101–1103.
  57. Penn I: Tumors after renal and cardiac transplantation. Hematol Oncol Clin North Am 1993;7:431–445.
  58. Penn I: Primary kidney tumors before and after renal transplantation. Transplantation 1995;59:480–485.

    External Resources

  59. Mellemgaard A, Moller H, Olsen J, Jensen OM: Diuretics may increase risk of renal-cell carcinoma. Cancer Causes Control 1992;3:309–312.
  60. Mellemgaard A, Niwa S, Mehl ES, Engholm G, McLaughlin JK, Olsen JH: Risk factors for renal cell carcinoma in Denmark: Role of medication and medical history. Int J Epidemiol 1994;23(5):923–930.
  61. Finkle WD, McLaughlin JK, Rasgon SA, Yeoh HH, Low JE: Increased risk of renal cell cancer among women using diuretics in the United States. Cancer Causes Control 1994;4:555–558.
  62. Weinmann S, Glass AG, Weiss NS, Psaty BM, Siscovick DS, White E: Use of diuretics and other antihypertensive medications in relation to the risk of renal cell cancer. Am J Epidemiol 1994;140:792–804.

    External Resources

  63. McLaughlin JK, Chow WH, Mandel JS, Mellemgaard A, McCredie M, Lindblad P, Schlehofer B, Pommer W, Niwa S, Adami HO: International renal-cell cancer study. 8. Role of diuretics, other anti-hypertensive medications and hypertension. Int J Cancer 1995;63:216–221.

    External Resources

  64. Pahor M, Guralnik J, Salive ME, Corti MC, Carbonin P, Havlik RJ: Do calcium channel blockers increase the risk of cancer? Am J Hypertens 1996;9:695–699.
  65. Pahor M, Guralnik JM, Ferrucci L, Corti M-C, Salive ME, Cerhan JR, Wallace RB, Havlik RJ: Calcium-channel blockade and incidence of cancer in aged populations. Lancet 1996;348:493–497.
  66. Trump BF, Jones TW, Elliget KA, Smith MW, Phelps PC, Maki A, Berezesky IK: Relation between toxicity and carcinogenesis in the kidney: An heuristic hypothesis. Renal Failure 1990;12:183–191.
  67. Trump BF, Berezesky IK: Calcium-mediated cell injury and cell death. FASEB J 1995;9:219–228.
  68. Whitfield JF: Calcium signals and cancer. Crit Rev Oncog 1992;3:55–90.

    External Resources

  69. Ray SD, Kamendulis LM, Gurule WM, Yorkin RD, Corcoran GR: CA2+ antagonists inhibit DNA fragmentation and toxic cell death induced by acetaminophen. FASEB J 1993;7:453–463.
  70. Yanagisawa H, Manabe S, Kanai YOW: Carcinogenic glutamic acid pyrolysis product in the dialysate of uremic patients treated by continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. Clin Nephrol 1988;30(2):73–78.
  71. Manabe S, Suzuki M, Kusano E, Wada O, Asano Y: Elevation of levels of carcinogenic tryptophan pyrolysis products in plasma and red blood cells of patients with uremia. Clin Nephrol 1992;37(1):28–33.
  72. Yanagisawa H, Wada O: Significance of IQ-type heterocyclic amines, dietary carcinogens in the plasma of patients with uremia just before induction of hemodialysis treatment. Nephron 1989;52:6–10.

    External Resources

  73. Dunn SR, Simenhoff ML, Lele PS, Goyal S, Pensabene JW, Fiddler W: N-nitrosodimethylamine blood levels in patients with chronic renal failure: Modulation of levels by ethanol and ascorbic acid. J Natl Cancer Inst 1990;82:783–787.
  74. Simenhoff ML, Dunn SR, Zollner GP, Fitzpatrick MED, Emery SM, Sandine WE, Ayres JW: Biomodulation of the toxic and nutritional effects of small bowel bacterial overgrowth in end-stage kidney disease using freeze-dried Lactobacillus acidophilus. Miner Electrolyte Metab 1996;22:92–96.

    External Resources

  75. Perna AF, Ingrosso D, De-Santo NG, Galletti P, Zappia V: Mechanism of erythrocyte accumulation of methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine in uremia. Kidney Int 1995;47(1):247–253.
  76. Galletti P, Ingrosso D, Manna C, Clemente G, Zappia V: Protein damage and methylation-mediated repair in the erythrocyte. Biochem J 1995;306(Pt 2):313–325.
  77. Perna A, Ingrosso D, Galletti P, Zappia V, De Santo NG: Membrane protein damage and methylation reactions in chronic renal failure. Kidney Int 1996;30:358–366.
  78. Wainfan E, Poirier LA: Methyl groups in carcinogenesis: Effects on DNA methylation and gene expression. Cancer Res 1992;52(suppl 7):2071S–2077S.
  79. Laird PW, Jaenisch R: DNA methylation and cancer. Hum Mol Genet 1994:1487–1495.
  80. Dizik M, Christman JK, Wainfan E: Alterations in expression and methylation of specific genes in livers of rats fed a cancer promoting methyl-deficient diet. Carcinogenesis 1991;12:1307–1312.
  81. Pogribny IP, Basnakian AG, Miller BJ, Lopatina NG, Poirier LA, James SJ: Breaks in genomic DNA and within the p53 gene are associated with hypomethylation in livers of folate/methyl-deficient rats. Cancer 1995;55:2711–2717.
  82. Craddock PR, Fehr J, Dalmasso AP, Brigham KL, Jacob HS: Hemodialysis leukopenia: Pulmonary vascular leukostasis resulting from complement activation by dialyzer cellophane membranes. J Clin Invest 1977;59:879–888.
  83. Heidland A, Hörl WH, Heller N, Heine H, Neumann S, Heidbreder E: Proteolytic enzymes and catabolism: Enhanced release of granulocyte proteinases in uremic intoxication and during hemodialysis. Kidney Int 1983;24(16):S27–S26.
  84. Hörl WH, Riegel W, Steinhauer HB, Wanner C, Schollmayer P, Schaefer RM, Heidland A: Plasma levels of main granulocyte components during hemodialysis; in Koch M, Streicher E (eds): Biological Reactions within the Extracorporeal Circuit during Hemodialysis. Contrib Nephrol. Basel, Karger, 1987, vol 59, pp 35–43.
  85. Dinarello CA, Koch KM, Shaldon S: Interleukin-1 and its relevance in patients with hemodialysis. Kidney Int 1988;33:S21–S26.
  86. Stefoni S, Feliciangeli G, Costa AN, Coli L, Cianciolo G, De Sanctis LB, Buscaroli A, Lannelli S, Mosconi G, Bonomini V: Approach to dialysis biocompatibility: Evaluation through in vivo investigation of lymphocyte biology; in Bonomini V (eds): Evolution in Dialysis Adequacy. Basel, Karger, 1993, vol 103, pp 65–75.
  87. Akizawa T, Kinugasa E, Koshikawa S: Increased risk of malignancy and blood-membrane interactions in uraemic patients. Nephrol Dial Transplant 1994;9(suppl 2):162–164.
  88. Bloembergen WE, Port FK, Hakim RM, Stannard D, Wolfe RA, Agodoa LYC, Held PJUS: The relationship of dialysis membrane and cause-specific mortality in chronic hemodialysis patients. Renal Data System Univ Mich JASN 1995;6:521A.
  89. Culotta E, Koshland DE: DNA repair works its way to the top. Science 1994;266:1926–1929.
  90. Vamvakas S, Bahner U, Becker P, Steinle A, Götz R, Heidland A: Impairment of DNA repair in the course of long-term hemodialysis and under cyclosporine immunosuppression after renal transplantation. Transplant Proc 1996;28:3468–3473.

    External Resources

  91. Zevin D, Malachi T, Gafter U, Friedman J, Levi J: Impaired DNA repair in patients with end-stage renal disease and its improvement with hemodialysis. Miner Electrolyte Metab 1991;17:303–306.
  92. Malachi T, Zevin D, Gafter U, Chagnac A, Slor H, Levi J: DNA repair and recovery of RNA synthesis in uremic patients. Kidney Int 1993;44:385–389.
  93. Massry SG: Parathyroid hormone: A uremic toxin; in Ringoir S, Vanholder R, Massry SG (eds): Uremic Toxins. New York, Plenum Press, 1987, pp 1–17.
  94. Malachi T, Gafter U, Weinstein T, Breitbart H: Elevated cellular calcium and impaired DNA repair ability in uremic patients. J Am Soc Nephrol 1995;6:583A.


Pay-per-View Options
Direct payment This item at the regular price: USD 38.00
Payment from account With a Karger Pay-per-View account (down payment USD 150) you profit from a special rate for this and other single items.
This item at the discounted price: USD 26.50