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Vol. 7, No. 1, 1998
Issue release date: January–February 1998

Cytokine-Neurotransmitter Interactions in the Brain

De Simoni M.G. · Imeri L.
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Abstract

The data reviewed in this study show that immune-active molecules, such as infectious agents and their components, and cytokines, may induce profound alterations in several neurotransmitters in the CNS. The activation of the immune system elicits fever, behavioral and neuroendocrine changes and may be involved in neuropathological changes occurring in CNS conditions. These effects may be achieved through and accounted for by the changes induced in central neurotransmitters and in the neuroendocrine system by immune challenges. The present review will summarize the available evidence of the reciprocal interactions between cytokines and neurotransmitters in the CNS.



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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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