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Vol. 27, No. 5, 2009
Issue release date: June 2009
Section title: Original Research Article
Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord 2009;27:451–457
(DOI:10.1159/000216840)

Visuospatial Ability and Memory Are Associated with Falls Risk in Older People

A Population-Based Study

Martin K. · Thomson R. · Blizzard L. · Wood A. · Garry M. · Srikanth V.
aMenzies Research Institute, and bSchool of Psychology, University of Tasmania, Hobart, Tas., cDepartment of Medicine, Southern Clinical School, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Clayton, Vic., and dCritical Care and Neurosciences, Murdoch Children’s Research Institute, Parkville, Vic., Australia

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Accepted: 1/16/2009
Published online: 5/7/2009

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/DEM

Abstract

Background/Aims: Our purpose was to examine whether falls risk is associated with cognitive functions beyond executive function/attention and processing speed. Methods: Cognitive function was measured in a population-based sample (n = 300) of people aged 60–86 years. The physiological profile assessment was used to estimate the falls risk. Results: After adjusting for confounders, visual construction (p < 0.01), executive function/attention and memory (both p < 0.05) were independently associated with falls risk. The associations for visual construction (p < 0.01) and memory (p < 0.01) remained after adjusting for executive function/ attention. Conclusions: The neural basis underlying the associations of visuospatial function and memory with falls risk require further study.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Research Article

Accepted: 1/16/2009
Published online: 5/7/2009

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1420-8008 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9824 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/DEM


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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