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Vol. 8, No. 2, 2000
Issue release date: August 2000
Section title: Original Paper
Neuroimmunomodulation 2000;8:83–90
(DOI:10.1159/000026457)

Central Monoamine Activity following Acute and Repeated Systemic Interleukin-2 Administration

Lacosta S. · Merali Z. · Anisman H.
aInstitute of Neuroscience, Carleton University, bSchool of Psychology and the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: 8/14/2000

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NIM

Abstract

Interleukin-2 (IL-2), together with other cytokines, may be involved in communication between the immune system and the CNS. Moreover, IL-2 alterations have been implicated in psychiatric disorders, and IL-2 immunotherapy may engender neuropsychiatric and cognitive disturbances. Given the presumed relationship between mood disturbances and monoamine activity, the present investigation was undertaken to determine the central monoamine alterations associated with acute and repeated systemic IL-2 administration in mice. Acute, systemic IL-2 (0.55–17.6 × 103 IU) did not influence plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone or corticosterone levels, but increased the utilization of norepinephrine (NE) within the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In contrast to the effects of acute IL-2 administration, when administered repeatedly (for 7 days), IL-2 increased NE utilization within the median eminence plus arcuate nucleus and in the hippocampus, and to a lesser extent in the central amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex. These changes in utilization were accompanied by increased levels of NE within the median eminence plus arcuate nucleus and central amygdala, and reduced NE within the locus coeruleus. As well, serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) levels were altered within the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, and dopamine turnover was reduced within the caudate and substantia nigra. The finding of altered central neurotransmitter activity needs to be considered in the context of the marked cognitive/memory impairments, as well as the neuropsychiatric symptoms, which are associated with IL-2 immunotherapy in humans.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Published online: 8/14/2000

Number of Print Pages: 8
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NIM


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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