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Vol. 2, No. 1, 2010
Issue release date: January – April
Open Access Gateway
Case Rep Neurol 2010;2:19–23
(DOI:10.1159/000296705)

Evolution of Callosal and Cortical Lesions on MRI in Marchiafava-Bignami Disease

Yoshizaki T.a · Hashimoto T.d · Fujimoto K.b · Oguchi K.c
Departments of aInternal Medicine, bEmergency Medicine, and cRadiology, dCenter for Neurological Diseases, Aizawa Hospital, Matsumoto, Japan
email Corresponding Author

Abstract

We report on serial MRI findings of cerebral lesions in a 55-year-old man with severe Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD). The first MRI change on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images was hyperintensity in the genu of the corpus callosum and in the frontoparietal cortex. Following this change, a splenial lesion appeared. The first MRI change in the genu of the corpus callosum was not associated with a change in diffusion on diffusion-weighted MRI imaging, suggesting a pathological change involving vasogenic edema. Development of cortical lesions in the initial stage confirms that cortical lesions result from the primary pathogenetic process induced by alcoholic intoxication and malnutrition in MBD.


 Outline


 goto top of outline Key Words

  • Marchiafava-Bignami disease
  • Corpus callosum
  • MRI
  • Diffusion-weighted imaging

 goto top of outline Abstract

We report on serial MRI findings of cerebral lesions in a 55-year-old man with severe Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD). The first MRI change on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images was hyperintensity in the genu of the corpus callosum and in the frontoparietal cortex. Following this change, a splenial lesion appeared. The first MRI change in the genu of the corpus callosum was not associated with a change in diffusion on diffusion-weighted MRI imaging, suggesting a pathological change involving vasogenic edema. Development of cortical lesions in the initial stage confirms that cortical lesions result from the primary pathogenetic process induced by alcoholic intoxication and malnutrition in MBD.

Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Dr. Takao Hashimoto
Center for Neurological Diseases
Aizawa Hospital
2-5-1 Honjo, Matsumoto 390-8510 (Japan)
Tel. +81 263 33 8600, Fax +81 263 33 8609, E-Mail sinke-dr@ai-hosp.or.jp


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: March 23, 2010
Number of Print Pages : 5
Number of Figures : 2,


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Case Reports in Neurology

Vol. 2, No. 1, Year 2010 (Cover Date: Janaury - April)

Journal Editor: Tatlisumak T. (Helsinki)
ISSN: NIL (Print), eISSN: 1662-680X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRN


Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

Abstract

We report on serial MRI findings of cerebral lesions in a 55-year-old man with severe Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD). The first MRI change on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images was hyperintensity in the genu of the corpus callosum and in the frontoparietal cortex. Following this change, a splenial lesion appeared. The first MRI change in the genu of the corpus callosum was not associated with a change in diffusion on diffusion-weighted MRI imaging, suggesting a pathological change involving vasogenic edema. Development of cortical lesions in the initial stage confirms that cortical lesions result from the primary pathogenetic process induced by alcoholic intoxication and malnutrition in MBD.



 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Dr. Takao Hashimoto
Center for Neurological Diseases
Aizawa Hospital
2-5-1 Honjo, Matsumoto 390-8510 (Japan)
Tel. +81 263 33 8600, Fax +81 263 33 8609, E-Mail sinke-dr@ai-hosp.or.jp


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: March 23, 2010
Number of Print Pages : 5
Number of Figures : 2,


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Case Reports in Neurology

Vol. 2, No. 1, Year 2010 (Cover Date: Janaury - April)

Journal Editor: Tatlisumak T. (Helsinki)
ISSN: NIL (Print), eISSN: 1662-680X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRN


Open Access License / Drug Dosage

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.