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Vol. 4, No. 2, 2010
Issue release date: May – August
Section title: Published: May 2010
Open Access Gateway
Case Rep Gastroenterol 2010;4:168–172
(DOI:10.1159/000314231)

The Face of Tropical Sprue in 2010

Batheja M.J.a · Leighton J.a · Azueta A.b · Heigh R.a
aDepartment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Ariz., USA; bDepartment of Anatomic Pathology, Hospital Txagorritxu, Vitoria, Spain
email Corresponding Author

Abstract

Tropical sprue (TS), although endemic in certain tropical regions of the world, is rarely seen in North America and Europe. However, in this era of globalization and worldwide travel, it is important for all clinicians to be aware of the possibility of TS in patients presenting with nonspecific, persistent gastrointestinal complaints like diarrhea and weight loss. The symptoms and histologic findings of TS can resemble and be confused with those of diseases seen more commonly in nontropical climates like celiac disease and small intestine bacterial overgrowth. Therefore, if the usual causes of persistent diarrhea are ruled out, keeping a high index of suspicion for TS in patients who have a travel history to one of the endemic regions is important.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


  

Key Words

  • Tropical sprue
  • Celiac disease
  • Diarrhea
  • Weight loss
  • Vitamin B12 deficiency
  • Tropical countries
  • Post-infective malabsorption

  

Author Contacts

Mashal Jatoi Batheja, MD
13400 East Shea Boulevard
Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (USA)
Tel. +1 480 301 6990, Fax +1 480 301 8673, E-Mail batheja.mashal@mayo.edu

  

Article Information

Published online: May 19, 2010
Number of Print Pages : 5
Number of Figures : 1,

  

Publication Details

Case Reports in Gastroenterology

Vol. 4, No. 2, Year 2010 (Cover Date: May - August)

Journal Editor: Urrutia R. (Rochester, Minn.)
ISSN: NIL (Print), eISSN: 1662-0631 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRG


Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

Abstract

Tropical sprue (TS), although endemic in certain tropical regions of the world, is rarely seen in North America and Europe. However, in this era of globalization and worldwide travel, it is important for all clinicians to be aware of the possibility of TS in patients presenting with nonspecific, persistent gastrointestinal complaints like diarrhea and weight loss. The symptoms and histologic findings of TS can resemble and be confused with those of diseases seen more commonly in nontropical climates like celiac disease and small intestine bacterial overgrowth. Therefore, if the usual causes of persistent diarrhea are ruled out, keeping a high index of suspicion for TS in patients who have a travel history to one of the endemic regions is important.

© 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


  

Author Contacts

Mashal Jatoi Batheja, MD
13400 East Shea Boulevard
Scottsdale, AZ 85259 (USA)
Tel. +1 480 301 6990, Fax +1 480 301 8673, E-Mail batheja.mashal@mayo.edu

  

Article Information

Published online: May 19, 2010
Number of Print Pages : 5
Number of Figures : 1,

  

Publication Details

Case Reports in Gastroenterology

Vol. 4, No. 2, Year 2010 (Cover Date: May - August)

Journal Editor: Urrutia R. (Rochester, Minn.)
ISSN: NIL (Print), eISSN: 1662-0631 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRG


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Published: May 2010

Published online: 5/19/2010
Issue release date: May – August

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: (Print)
eISSN: 1662-0631 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRG


Open Access License / Drug Dosage

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.