Vol. 44, No. 5, 2010
Issue release date: November 2010
Free Access
Caries Res 2010;44:485–497
(DOI:10.1159/000320158)
Original Paper
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Clonal Analysis of the Microbiota of Severe Early Childhood Caries

Kanasi E.a, c · Dewhirst F.E.a, d · Chalmers N.I.a · Kent, Jr. R.b, c · Moore A.e · Hughes C.V.f · Pradhan N.g · Loo C.Y.g · Tanner A.C.R.a, d
aDepartment of Molecular Genetics and bDepartment of Biostatistics, The Forsyth Institute, cOral Health Policy and Epidemiology, dDepartment of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity and eHarvard School of Dental Medicine, Harvard University, fDepartment of Pediatric Dentistry, Goldman School of Dental Medicine, Boston University, and gDepartment of Pediatric Dentistry, Tufts School of Dental Medicine, Tufts University, Boston, Mass., USA
email Corresponding Author


 goto top of outline Key Words

  • Bifidobacteria
  • Clonal analysis
  • PCR
  • Severe early childhood caries
  • Streptococcus mutans

 goto top of outline Abstract

Background/Aims: Severe early childhood caries is a microbial infection that severely compromises the dentition of young children. The aim of this study was to characterize the microbiota of severe early childhood caries. Methods: Dental plaque samples from 2- to 6-year-old children were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing, and by specific PCR amplification for Streptococcus mutans and Bifidobacteriaceae species. Results: Children with severe caries (n = 39) had more dental plaque and gingival inflammation than caries-free children (n = 41). Analysis of phylotypes from operational taxonomic unit analysis of 16S rRNA clonal metalibraries from severe caries and caries-free children indicated that while libraries differed significantly (p < 0.0001), there was increased diversity than detected in this clonal analysis. Using the Human Oral Microbiome Database, 139 different taxa were identified. Within the limits of this study, caries-associated taxa included Granulicatella elegans (p < 0.01) and Veillonella sp. HOT-780 (p < 0.01). The species associated with caries-free children included Capnocytophaga gingivalis (p < 0.01), Abiotrophia defectiva (p < 0.01), Lachnospiraceae sp. HOT-100 (p < 0.05), Streptococcus sanguinis (p < 0.05) and Streptococcus cristatus (p < 0.05). By specific PCR, S. mutans (p < 0.005) and Bifidobacteriaceae spp. (p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with severe caries. Conclusion: Clonal analysis of 80 children identified a diverse microbiota that differed between severe caries and caries-free children, but the association of S. mutans with caries was from specific PCR analysis, not from clonal analysis, of samples.

Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel


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 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Anne C.R. Tanner
The Forsyth Institute
140 The Fenway
Boston MA 02115 (USA)
Tel. +1 617 892 8285, Fax +1 617 892 8614, E-Mail annetanner@forsyth.org


 goto top of outline Article Information

Received: March 25, 2010
Accepted after revision: July 27, 2010
Published online: September 23, 2010
Number of Print Pages : 13
Number of Figures : 3, Number of Tables : 1, Number of References : 50


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Caries Research

Vol. 44, No. 5, Year 2010 (Cover Date: November 2010)

Journal Editor: Beighton D. (London)
ISSN: 0008-6568 (Print), eISSN: 1421-976X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRE


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