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Vol. 57, No. 3, 2011
Issue release date: April 2011
Section title: Bridging the Gap between Clinical and Behavioural Gerontology Part I: Promoting Late-Life ...
Gerontology 2011;57:247–255
(DOI:10.1159/000322196)

Age-Related Effects on Postural Control under Multi-Task Conditions

Granacher U. · Bridenbaugh S.A. · Muehlbauer T. · Wehrle A. · Kressig R.W.
aInstitute of Exercise and Health Sciences, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; bInstitute of Sport Science, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Jena, Germany; cDivision of Acute Geriatrics, Basel University Hospital, Basel, Switzerland

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Bridging the Gap between Clinical and Behavioural Gerontology Part I: Promoting Late-Life ...

Published online: 10/27/2010

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0304-324X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/GER

Abstract

Background: Changes in postural sway and gait patterns due to simultaneously performed cognitive (CI) and/or motor interference (MI) tasks have previously been reported and are associated with an increased risk of falling in older adults. Objective: The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of a CI and/or MI task on static and dynamic postural control in young and elderly subjects, and to find out whether there is an association between measures of static and dynamic postural control while concurrently performing the CI and/or MI task. Methods: A total of 36 healthy young (n = 18; age: 22.3 ± 3.0 years; BMI: 21.0 ± 1.6 kg/m2) and elderly adults (n = 18; age: 73.5 ± 5.5 years; BMI: 24.2 ± 2.9 kg/m2) participated in this study. Static postural control was measured during bipedal stance, and dynamic postural control was obtained while walking on an instrumented walkway. Results: Irrespective of the task condition, i.e. single-task or multiple tasks, elderly participants showed larger center-of-pressure displacements and greater stride-to-stride variability than younger participants. Associations between measures of static and dynamic postural control were found only under the single-task condition in the elderly. Conclusion: Age-related deficits in the postural control system seem to be primarily responsible for the observed results. The weak correlations detected between static and dynamic measures could indicate that fall-risk assessment should incorporate dynamic measures under multi-task conditions, and that skills like erect standing and walking are independent of each other and may have to be trained complementarily.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Bridging the Gap between Clinical and Behavioural Gerontology Part I: Promoting Late-Life ...

Published online: 10/27/2010

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 3

ISSN: 0304-324X (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0003 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/GER


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Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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