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Vol. 28, No. 4, 2011
Issue release date: 2011
Cell Physiol Biochem 2011;28:733–742
(DOI:10.1159/000335767)

Uroguanylin Regulates Net Fluid Secretion via the NHE2 Isoform of the Na+/H+ Exchanger in an Intestinal Cellular Model

Toriano R.1 · Ozu M.1 · Politi M.T.1 · Dorr R.A.1 · Curto M.A.2 · Capurro C.1
1Laboratorio de Biomembranas, Departamento de Fisiología y Biofísica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires2Laboratorio de Biología Molecular de la Enfermedad de Chagas, INGEBI, UBA-CONICET
email Corresponding Author

Abstract

Uroguanylin (UGN) has been proposed as a key regulator of salt and water intestinal transport. Uroguanylin activates cell-surface guanylate cyclase C receptor (GC-C) and modulates cellular function via cyclic GMP (cGMP), thus increasing electrolyte and net water secretion. It has been suggested that the action of UGN could involve the Na+/H+ exchanger, but the actual contribution of this transporter still remains unclear. The objective of our study was to investigate the putative effects of UGN on some members of the Na+/H+ exchanger family (NHEs), as well as to clarify its consequences on transepithelial fluid flow in T84 cells. In order to do so, transepithelial fluid flow (Jv) was studied by optic techniques and intracellular pH (pHi) was measured with a fluorescence method. Results showed that NHE2 is found at the apical membrane and has a major role in Na+ absorption; NHE1 and NHE4 are localized at the basolateral membrane with a house-keeping role in steady state pHi. In the assayed conditions, cell exposure to apical UGN increases net secretory Jv, without changing short-circuit currents nor transepithelial resistance, and reduces NHE2 activity. Therefore, at physiological pH, the effect on net Jv was produced mainly by a reduction in normal Na+ absorption through NHE2, rather than by the stimulation of electrolyte secretion. Our study shows that the effect of UGN on pHi is GC-C/cGMP-mediated and enhanced by sildenafil, thus involving PDE5 enzyme. Additionally, cell exposure to apical UGN results in intracellular alkalinization, probably due to indirect effects on basolateral NHE1 and NHE4, which have a major role in pHi regulation.


 Outline


 goto top of outline Key Words

  • Water transport
  • Intracellular pH
  • Uroguanylin
  • T84 cells
  • Na+/H+ exchanger
  • Sildenafil

 goto top of outline Abstract

Uroguanylin (UGN) has been proposed as a key regulator of salt and water intestinal transport. Uroguanylin activates cell-surface guanylate cyclase C receptor (GC-C) and modulates cellular function via cyclic GMP (cGMP), thus increasing electrolyte and net water secretion. It has been suggested that the action of UGN could involve the Na+/H+ exchanger, but the actual contribution of this transporter still remains unclear. The objective of our study was to investigate the putative effects of UGN on some members of the Na+/H+ exchanger family (NHEs), as well as to clarify its consequences on transepithelial fluid flow in T84 cells. In order to do so, transepithelial fluid flow (Jv) was studied by optic techniques and intracellular pH (pHi) was measured with a fluorescence method. Results showed that NHE2 is found at the apical membrane and has a major role in Na+ absorption; NHE1 and NHE4 are localized at the basolateral membrane with a house-keeping role in steady state pHi. In the assayed conditions, cell exposure to apical UGN increases net secretory Jv, without changing short-circuit currents nor transepithelial resistance, and reduces NHE2 activity. Therefore, at physiological pH, the effect on net Jv was produced mainly by a reduction in normal Na+ absorption through NHE2, rather than by the stimulation of electrolyte secretion. Our study shows that the effect of UGN on pHi is GC-C/cGMP-mediated and enhanced by sildenafil, thus involving PDE5 enzyme. Additionally, cell exposure to apical UGN results in intracellular alkalinization, probably due to indirect effects on basolateral NHE1 and NHE4, which have a major role in pHi regulation.

Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel


 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Dr. Roxana Toriano
Laboratorio de Biomembranas, Departamento de Fisiología y Biofísica,
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) Paraguay 2155, Piso 7 (CP 1121) Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Tel. +54-114964-0503, Fax +54-114964-0503, E-Mail rtoriano@fmed.uba.ar


 goto top of outline Article Information

Accepted: August 26, 2011
Published online: December 14, 2011
Number of Print Pages : 10


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry (International Journal of Experimental Cellular Physiology, Biochemistry andPharmacology)

Vol. 28, No. 4, Year 2011 (Cover Date: 2011)

Journal Editor: F. Lang, Tübingen
ISSN: 1015–8987 (Print), eISSN: 1421–9778 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/journals/cpb


Copyright / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

Abstract

Uroguanylin (UGN) has been proposed as a key regulator of salt and water intestinal transport. Uroguanylin activates cell-surface guanylate cyclase C receptor (GC-C) and modulates cellular function via cyclic GMP (cGMP), thus increasing electrolyte and net water secretion. It has been suggested that the action of UGN could involve the Na+/H+ exchanger, but the actual contribution of this transporter still remains unclear. The objective of our study was to investigate the putative effects of UGN on some members of the Na+/H+ exchanger family (NHEs), as well as to clarify its consequences on transepithelial fluid flow in T84 cells. In order to do so, transepithelial fluid flow (Jv) was studied by optic techniques and intracellular pH (pHi) was measured with a fluorescence method. Results showed that NHE2 is found at the apical membrane and has a major role in Na+ absorption; NHE1 and NHE4 are localized at the basolateral membrane with a house-keeping role in steady state pHi. In the assayed conditions, cell exposure to apical UGN increases net secretory Jv, without changing short-circuit currents nor transepithelial resistance, and reduces NHE2 activity. Therefore, at physiological pH, the effect on net Jv was produced mainly by a reduction in normal Na+ absorption through NHE2, rather than by the stimulation of electrolyte secretion. Our study shows that the effect of UGN on pHi is GC-C/cGMP-mediated and enhanced by sildenafil, thus involving PDE5 enzyme. Additionally, cell exposure to apical UGN results in intracellular alkalinization, probably due to indirect effects on basolateral NHE1 and NHE4, which have a major role in pHi regulation.



 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Dr. Roxana Toriano
Laboratorio de Biomembranas, Departamento de Fisiología y Biofísica,
Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) Paraguay 2155, Piso 7 (CP 1121) Buenos Aires (Argentina)
Tel. +54-114964-0503, Fax +54-114964-0503, E-Mail rtoriano@fmed.uba.ar


 goto top of outline Article Information

Accepted: August 26, 2011
Published online: December 14, 2011
Number of Print Pages : 10


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry (International Journal of Experimental Cellular Physiology, Biochemistry andPharmacology)

Vol. 28, No. 4, Year 2011 (Cover Date: 2011)

Journal Editor: F. Lang, Tübingen
ISSN: 1015–8987 (Print), eISSN: 1421–9778 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/journals/cpb


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.