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Table of Contents
Vol. 29, No. 2, 2012
Issue release date: June 2012
Dig Surg 2012;29:157–164
(DOI:10.1159/000337312)

Postoperative Hematological Changes after Spleen-Preserving Distal Pancreatectomy with Preservation of the Splenic Artery and Vein

Tezuka K. · Kimura W. · Hirai I. · Moriya T. · Watanabe T. · Yano M.
Department of Gastroenterological, Breast, Thyroid and General Surgery, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan

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Abstract

Background: The aim of this study was to determine the early postoperative hematological changes after spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy (SpDP) with preservation of the splenic artery and vein (PSAV). Methods: We reviewed 53 patients who underwent SpDP with PSAV (n = 21) or distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (DPS; n = 32) for benign or low-grade malignant lesions between July 1998 and June 2010. Red and white blood cell (WBC) count, platelet count, serum hemoglobin, hematocrit, C-reactive protein, albumin level, and clinical factors were compared between the SpDP with PSAV and DPS. Results: There were no significant differences in the patient characteristics between the two groups. Platelet count on postoperative day (POD) 5 and WBC count on POD 3 were significantly higher in the DPS group, and these differences continued to be significant until the 3rd month after surgery. Serum hemoglobin and hematocrit in the 1st month after surgery were also significantly higher in the SpDP with PSAV group. Conclusion: The hematological benefits of SpDP with PSAV include reduction of postoperative hematological abnormalities in the early postoperative phase and recovery of the serum hemoglobin and hematocrit levels in the early postoperative phase.



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