Journal Mobile Options
Table of Contents
Vol. 6, No. 1, 2012
Issue release date: January – April
Open Access Gateway
Case Rep Gastroenterol 2012;6:205–210
(DOI:10.1159/000338740)

Prolonged Survival in a Patient with Neuroendocrine Tumor of the Cecum and Diffuse Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

de Mestier L.a · Neuzillet C.a · Hentic O.a · Kianmanesh R.b · Hammel P.a · Ruszniewski P.a
aService de Gastroentérologie-Pancréatologie and bService de Chirurgie Hépato-Biliaire, Pôle des Maladies de l’Appareil Digestif, Hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP and Université Paris VII – Denis Diderot), Clichy, France
email Corresponding Author

Abstract

Peritoneal carcinomatosis is a well-known factor of poor prognosis in patients with digestive adenocarcinomas. Peritoneal dissemination may also occur in midgut well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, but its influence on survival is ill-defined. We report here the history of a 64-year-old woman who had a neuroendocrine tumor of the cecum with multiple synchronous metastases in the liver and diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis. She underwent surgical resection of the primary tumor and cytoreduction of liver metastases, and received subsequently chemotherapy and somatostatin analogs. In spite of the widespread extension of the disease, she survived for 13 years and died from a carcinoid heart disease. We discuss the natural history and prognostic factors in patients with midgut well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, with a focus on the impact of the peritoneal carcinomatosis.


 Outline


 goto top of outline Key Words

  • Digestive neuroendocrine tumors
  • Dissemination
  • Peritoneal carcinomatosis
  • Prognosis
  • Survival

 goto top of outline Abstract

Peritoneal carcinomatosis is a well-known factor of poor prognosis in patients with digestive adenocarcinomas. Peritoneal dissemination may also occur in midgut well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, but its influence on survival is ill-defined. We report here the history of a 64-year-old woman who had a neuroendocrine tumor of the cecum with multiple synchronous metastases in the liver and diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis. She underwent surgical resection of the primary tumor and cytoreduction of liver metastases, and received subsequently chemotherapy and somatostatin analogs. In spite of the widespread extension of the disease, she survived for 13 years and died from a carcinoid heart disease. We discuss the natural history and prognostic factors in patients with midgut well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, with a focus on the impact of the peritoneal carcinomatosis.

Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Prof. Pascal Hammel
Service de Gastroentérologie-PancréatologiePôle des Maladies de l’Appareil Digestif, Hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP)
100 boulevard Leclerc, FR–92110 Clichy (France)
E-Mail pascal.hammel@bjn.aphp.fr


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: April 30, 2012
Number of Print Pages : 6
Number of Tables : 2,


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Case Reports in Gastroenterology

Vol. 6, No. 1, Year 2012 (Cover Date: January - April)

Journal Editor: Urrutia R. (Rochester, Minn.), Lomberk G. (Rochester, Minn.)
ISSN: 1662-0631 (Print), eISSN: 1662-0631 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRG


Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

Abstract

Peritoneal carcinomatosis is a well-known factor of poor prognosis in patients with digestive adenocarcinomas. Peritoneal dissemination may also occur in midgut well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, but its influence on survival is ill-defined. We report here the history of a 64-year-old woman who had a neuroendocrine tumor of the cecum with multiple synchronous metastases in the liver and diffuse peritoneal carcinomatosis. She underwent surgical resection of the primary tumor and cytoreduction of liver metastases, and received subsequently chemotherapy and somatostatin analogs. In spite of the widespread extension of the disease, she survived for 13 years and died from a carcinoid heart disease. We discuss the natural history and prognostic factors in patients with midgut well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, with a focus on the impact of the peritoneal carcinomatosis.



 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Prof. Pascal Hammel
Service de Gastroentérologie-PancréatologiePôle des Maladies de l’Appareil Digestif, Hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP)
100 boulevard Leclerc, FR–92110 Clichy (France)
E-Mail pascal.hammel@bjn.aphp.fr


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: April 30, 2012
Number of Print Pages : 6
Number of Tables : 2,


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Case Reports in Gastroenterology

Vol. 6, No. 1, Year 2012 (Cover Date: January - April)

Journal Editor: Urrutia R. (Rochester, Minn.), Lomberk G. (Rochester, Minn.)
ISSN: 1662-0631 (Print), eISSN: 1662-0631 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRG


Open Access License / Drug Dosage

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.