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Vol. 5, No. 3, 2012
Issue release date: September – December
Open Access Gateway
Case Rep Oncol 2012;5:490–494
(DOI:10.1159/000342480)

Discrepant MR and [18F]Fluoroethyl-l-Tyrosine PET Imaging Findings in a Patient with Bevacizumab Failure

Galldiks N.a, c · Filss C.P.a, b · Goldbrunner R.d · Langen K.-J.a, b
aInstitute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich, bJuelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) – Section JARA Brain, Aachen, and Departments of cNeurology and dNeurosurgery, University Hospital Cologne, Cologne, Germany
email Corresponding Author

Abstract

Antiangiogenic treatment using bevacizumab may cause difficulties in distinguishing between antivascular and true antitumor effects when using MRI response criteria based on changes of contrast enhancement (i.e., Macdonald criteria). Furthermore, more precise tumor response assessment criteria (i.e., RANO criteria), which incorporate nonenhancing T2/FLAIR sequences into Macdonald criteria, may be influenced by other causes of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity (e.g., radiation-induced gliosis). The authors present discrepant MR and [18F]fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine PET imaging findings in a patient with bevacizumab treatment failure.


 Outline


 goto top of outline Key Words

  • Volume-of-interest analysis
  • Metabolically active tumor volume
  • Amino acid PET
  • [18F]Fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine
  • RANO criteria

 goto top of outline Abstract

Antiangiogenic treatment using bevacizumab may cause difficulties in distinguishing between antivascular and true antitumor effects when using MRI response criteria based on changes of contrast enhancement (i.e., Macdonald criteria). Furthermore, more precise tumor response assessment criteria (i.e., RANO criteria), which incorporate nonenhancing T2/FLAIR sequences into Macdonald criteria, may be influenced by other causes of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity (e.g., radiation-induced gliosis). The authors present discrepant MR and [18F]fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine PET imaging findings in a patient with bevacizumab treatment failure.

Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel


 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Norbert Galldiks, MD
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3)Forschungszentrum Juelich
DE–52425 Juelich (Germany)
E-Mail n.galldiks@fz-juelich.de


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: September 8, 2012
Number of Print Pages : 5
Number of Figures : 1,


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Case Reports in Oncology

Vol. 5, No. 3, Year 2012 (Cover Date: September - December)

Journal Editor: Markman M. (Philadelphia, Pa.)
ISSN: 1662-6575 (Print), eISSN: 1662-6575 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRO


Open Access License / Drug Dosage / Disclaimer

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

Abstract

Antiangiogenic treatment using bevacizumab may cause difficulties in distinguishing between antivascular and true antitumor effects when using MRI response criteria based on changes of contrast enhancement (i.e., Macdonald criteria). Furthermore, more precise tumor response assessment criteria (i.e., RANO criteria), which incorporate nonenhancing T2/FLAIR sequences into Macdonald criteria, may be influenced by other causes of T2/FLAIR hyperintensity (e.g., radiation-induced gliosis). The authors present discrepant MR and [18F]fluoroethyl-l-tyrosine PET imaging findings in a patient with bevacizumab treatment failure.



 goto top of outline Author Contacts

Norbert Galldiks, MD
Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM-3)Forschungszentrum Juelich
DE–52425 Juelich (Germany)
E-Mail n.galldiks@fz-juelich.de


 goto top of outline Article Information

Published online: September 8, 2012
Number of Print Pages : 5
Number of Figures : 1,


 goto top of outline Publication Details

Case Reports in Oncology

Vol. 5, No. 3, Year 2012 (Cover Date: September - December)

Journal Editor: Markman M. (Philadelphia, Pa.)
ISSN: 1662-6575 (Print), eISSN: 1662-6575 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/CRO


Open Access License / Drug Dosage

Open Access License: This is an Open Access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported license (CC BY-NC) (www.karger.com/OA-license), applicable to the online version of the article only. Distribution permitted for non-commercial purposes only.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.