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Vol. 36, Suppl. 2, 1999
Issue release date: September 1999
Section title: Paper
Eur Urol 1999;36(suppl 2):20–26
(DOI:10.1159/000052339)

Quality of Life Issues Relating to Endocrine Treatment Options

Iversen P.
Department of Urology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 10/11/1999

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0302-2838 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-993X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/EUR

Abstract

Recent interest has focused on the use of hormone therapy in prostate cancer for both the management of patients with non-metastatic disease and as a neoadjuvant or adjuvant to curative therapies. This has resulted in patients with fewer symptoms being treated for longer periods of time. Endocrine treatments for prostate cancer, such as castration, combined androgen blockade and non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy, have shown similar results in terms of time to progression and survival. The main difference between these treatments is their impact on patients’ quality of life. Instruments for measuring health-related quality of life should assess both overall and disease-specific quality of life. Data from two large studies of bicalutamide monotherapy show that this non-steroidal antiandrogen is associated with significant health-related quality of life advantages in the treatment of patients with locally advanced (M0) disease compared with castration, suggesting that this treatment may benefit patients with early disease. Bicalutamide was favoured in 8 out of 9 evaluable quality of life dimensions, and this was statistically significant for sexual interest and physical capacity. Endocrine treatments with minimal adverse effects on quality of life will be increasingly favoured for patients with non-metastatic disease who are being treated for longer periods of time.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 10/11/1999

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 6
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0302-2838 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-993X (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/EUR


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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

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