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Table of Contents
Vol. 11, No. 1, 2002
Issue release date: 2002
Neurosignals 2002;11:5–19
(DOI:10.1159/000057317)

Integration of Signals from Receptor Tyrosine Kinases and G Protein-Coupled Receptors

Lowes V.L. · Ip N.Y. · Wong Y.H.
Department of Biochemistry, Biotechnology Research Institute and Molecular Neuroscience Center, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong, China

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Abstract

Activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) leads to stimulation of classical G protein signaling pathways. In addition, GPCRs can activate the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) such as the extracellular signal-regulated kinases, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs), and p38 MAPKs, and thereby influence cell proliferation, cell differentiation and mitogenesis. Cross talk between GPCRs and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is an incredibly complex process, and the exact signaling molecules involved are largely dependent on the cell type and the type of receptor that is activated. In this review we investigate recent advances that have been made in understanding the mechanisms of cross talk between GPCRs and RTKs, with a focus on GPCR-mediated activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway, GPCR-induced transactivation of RTKs, GPCR-mediated activation of JNK, and p38 MAPK, integration of signals by RhoGTPases, and activation of G protein signaling pathways by RTKs.



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Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
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