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Vol. 59, No. 1-2, 2002
Issue release date: 2002
Section title: Paper
Brain Behav Evol 2002;59:68–86
(DOI:10.1159/000063734)

Behavioral Studies of Learning in the Africanized Honey Bee (Apis mellifera L.)

Abramson C.I. · Aquino I.S.
aLaboratory of Comparative Psychology and Behavioral Biology, Departments of Psychology and Zoology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Okla., USA, bDepartamento de Agropecuária, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Campus IV, Bananeiras, Brazil

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 6/19/2002

Number of Print Pages: 19
Number of Figures: 14
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0006-8977 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9743 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/BBE

Abstract

Experiments on basic classical conditioning phenomena in adult and young Africanized honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) are described. Phenomena include conditioning to various stimuli, extinction (both unpaired and CS only), conditioned inhibition, color and odor discrimination. In addition to work on basic phenomena, experiments on practical applications of conditioning methodology are illustrated with studies demonstrating the effects of insecticides on learning and the reaction of bees to consumer products. Electron microscope photos are presented of Africanized workers, drones, and queen bees. Possible sub-species differences between Africanized and European bees are discussed.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: 6/19/2002

Number of Print Pages: 19
Number of Figures: 14
Number of Tables: 0

ISSN: 0006-8977 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9743 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/BBE


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