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Table of Contents
Vol. 129, No. 1, 2002
Issue release date: September 2002
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2002;129:19–26
(DOI:10.1159/000065181)

Role of Adverse Reactions to Food in Urticaria and Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis

Chong S.-U. · Worm M. · Zuberbier T.
Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Charité, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany

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Abstract

In urticaria, adverse reactions to food are only a frequent finding in the subset of patients with chronic continuous urticaria. Mostly these reactions are of pseudoallergic nature, directed against artificial additives as well as naturally occurring aromatic components. IgE-mediated allergic reactions are a rare cause in acute urticaria as well as in recurrent chronic urticaria. In other types of urticaria, e.g. physical urticaria, food plays hardly any role as an eliciting agent with the exception of ice-cold drinks in cold urticaria. By contrast, exercise-induced anaphylaxis is frequently food-dependent. Two subtypes are distinguished: unspecific food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA), where the filling of the stomach independently of the kind of food ingested prior to exercise is responsible for the symptoms. In specific FDEIA, an IgE-mediated food allergy causes symptoms only in combination with exercise. In the latter group, wheat is an important allergen.



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