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Table of Contents
Vol. 11, No. 5, 2002
Issue release date: September–October 2002
Neurosignals 2002;11:262–269
(DOI:10.1159/000067425)

Role of Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase in Alzheimer’s Disease

Tian Q. · Wang J.
Pathophysiology Department, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, PR China

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Abstract

Accumulating evidence indicates that serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatases (PPs), such as PP1, PP2A and PP2B, participate in the neurodegenerative progress in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The general characteristics and pathologic changes of PP1, PP2A and PP2B in AD, and their relations with microtubule-associated proteins, focusing mainly on τ protein, neurofilament (NF), amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and synaptic plasticity are discussed. Deriving novel insight into the particular topic will attract greater attention to more active investigation and effective therapeutic intervention in the future.



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