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Table of Contents
Vol. 10, No. 6, 2002/2003
Issue release date: August 2003
Section title: Review
Neuroimmunomodulation 2002–03;10:319–327
(DOI:10.1159/000071472)

Entry of Blood-Borne Cytokines into the Central Nervous System: Effects on Cognitive Processes

Banks W.A. · Farr S.A. · Morley J.E.
GRECC, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, St. Louis and Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Louis, Mo., USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Published online: 8/15/2003

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NIM

Abstract

Blood-borne cytokines affect many aspects of the central nervous system (CNS). One of the more dramatic effects is the induction of sickness behavior. Impairments in learning and memory are an important component of sickness behavior and are largely mediated by IL-1. Many mechanisms have been proposed by which a cytokine circulating in the blood can affect functions within the CNS. We review here the role one of those mechanisms, that of transport of cytokines across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), plays in induction of the memory impairments of sickness behavior. We have shown that the posterior division of the septum (PDS) plays a key role in mediating the effects of interleukin-1α (IL-1α) on memory. Furthermore, this effect at the PDS is largely mediated by circulating IL-1α acting directly at the PDS which, in turn, depends on the ability of IL-1α to cross the BBB.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Review

Published online: 8/15/2003

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1021-7401 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0216 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NIM


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

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