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Vol. 2, No. 5, 2005
Issue release date: February 2006
Section title: Special Topic Section: Immunotherapies and Related Strategies in Alzheimer’s ...
Neurodegenerative Dis 2005;2:255–260
(DOI:10.1159/000090365)

Aβ Immunotherapy: Lessons Learned for Potential Treatment of Alzheimer’s Disease

Schenk D.B. · Seubert P. · Grundman M. · Black R.
aElan Pharmaceuticals, San Francisco, Calif., and bWyeth Laboratories, Collegeville, Pa., USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Special Topic Section: Immunotherapies and Related Strategies in Alzheimer’s ...

Received: 6/27/2005
Accepted: 9/5/2005
Published online: 2/22/2006

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1660-2854 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-2862 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NDD

Abstract

Amyloid-β (Aβ) immunotherapy for treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) was first described in 1999 and has been very informative regarding the role of Aβin AD. Through the efforts of many laboratories we now know that it is possible to reduce amyloid burden and many related AD pathologies in numerous animal models of the disease. Furthermore, initial clinical testing with AN1792, composed of Aβ1–42 and an adjuvant, has yielded very important insights into both the clinical potential of the approach and the impact of Aβpeptide on the disease. A brief review of our current understanding of Aβimmunotherapy is described. These findings have led to newer alternative Aβimmunotherapy approaches that include both active and passive approaches that are currently in clinical testing in both the USA and Europe.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Special Topic Section: Immunotherapies and Related Strategies in Alzheimer’s ...

Received: 6/27/2005
Accepted: 9/5/2005
Published online: 2/22/2006

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1660-2854 (Print)
eISSN: 1660-2862 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/NDD


Copyright / Drug Dosage

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

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