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Table of Contents
Vol. 9, No. 1, 2006
Issue release date: February 2006
Section title: Assessment
Community Genet 2006;9:21–26
(DOI:10.1159/000090689)

Genomics and Public Health in the United States: Signposts on the Translation Highway

Gwinn M. · Khoury M.J.
Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga., USA

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Assessment

Received: 6/10/2005
Published online: 2/17/2006

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1662-4246 (Print)
eISSN: 1662-8063 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PHG

Abstract

Successful completion of the Human Genome Project has raised public expectations that research findings will translate quickly into health benefits; however, the gap between biomedical research and clinical and public health application seems wider than ever. Public health scientists now have the opportunity to help create a broad concept of research translation that integrates genomic information into policies, programs and sevices benefiting the whole population. Important ’signposts’ along the translation highway include conducting population-based reearch in genomics, developing evidence on the clinical and public health value of genomic information, and integrating genomics into health practice.


Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Assessment

Received: 6/10/2005
Published online: 2/17/2006

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 1
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1662-4246 (Print)
eISSN: 1662-8063 (Online)

For additional information: http://www.karger.com/PHG


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Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher or, in the case of photocopying, direct payment of a specified fee to the Copyright Clearance Center.
Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in goverment regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug.
Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

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