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Table of Contents
Vol. 213, No. 2, 2006
Issue release date: August 2006
Dermatology 2006;213:102–110
(DOI:10.1159/000093848)

Work Limitations and Productivity Loss Are Associated with Health-Related Quality of Life but Not with Clinical Severity in Patients with Psoriasis

Schmitt J.M. · Ford D.E.
aDepartment of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Departments of bMedicine and cPsychiatry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md., USA; dDepartment of Dermatology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Dresden, Germany

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Abstract

Background: According to current guidelines the cost of productivity loss should be considered in pharmacoeconomic analyses. The cost of health-related productivity loss in psoriasis patients is unknown. Objective: To estimate the cost of productivity loss in psoriasis and its association with health-related quality of life and clinical disease severity. Methods: Cross-sectional study, recruitment of adult participants through Internet advertisements. 201 (72.3%) out of 278 eligible participants completed the study. Health-related work productivity loss, quality of life and clinical severity of psoriasis were assessed by standardized instruments. Results: Indirect costs of productivity loss clearly exceed the total direct cost. In contrast to objective clinical disease severity, health-related quality of life (measured by the Dermatology Life Quality Index) is an independent predictor of work productivity. Conclusions: There is good reason to believe that intervention can reduce health-related productivity loss by improving patients’ quality of life. Savings from increased work productivity might offset comparatively high acquisition costs of biological agents.



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