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Status: available   
Publication year: 2002

Genetic Hearing Impairment

Its Clinical Presentations

Editor(s): Cremers C.W.R.J. (Nijmegen) 
Smith R.J.H. (Iowa City, Iowa) 


This book belongs to
Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology , Vol. 61
Editor(s): Randolph G. (Boston, Mass.) 
XIV + 248 p., 79 fig., 23 tab., hard cover, 2002
Status: available   
ISSN: 0065-3071
e-ISSN: 1662-2847

'This volume is handsomely produced on high quality paper, is beautifully bound and will be of value to otolaryngologists seeking education and enlightenment in the field of genetic deafness, as well as of practical value to audiological physicians and others charged with managing patients and attempting to target investigations appropriately in a specific case.'
Human Genetics

'The clinical characteristics of the various abnormalities are clearly described, assisted by illustrations, tables and pedigrees. As genetic hearing defects are also part of some endocrine diseases ... this book is also of interest to pediatric endocrinologists in addition to ENT specialists and geneticists.'
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism

Presenting the phenotype of genetic non-syndromic and the most frequent syndromic types of hearing impairment
A decade of innovative findings in the research of molecular biology of hearing and deafness is reflected in this volume. The genetic causes for many types of syndromic and non-syndromic deafness are identified and genotypic-phenotypic relationships are explored. Although the type and degree of deafness caused by mutations in different genes significantly overlap, relatively unique age-related audiometric profiles are also emerging. For example, the audioprofile of DFNA1 and DFNA6-14 is a low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss; with DFNA8-14 it is a mid-frequency sensorineural hearing loss, and with DFNA2, DFNA5 and DFNA20-26 it is a high-frequency progressive hearing loss. Recognizing such audioprofiles can facilitate well-guided decision-making in clinical practice and can direct genetic testing for deafness. With an accurate genetic diagnosis, prognostic information can be provided to patients and their families. In the future, gene-specific habilitation options may also become available.

To keep up to date with new clinical standards of diagnosing genetic hearing impairment, this book is indispensable reading to otorhinolaryngologists and audiologists.

Bibliographic Details

Advances in Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Vol. 61
Genetic Hearing Impairment
Its Clinical Presentations
Editor(s): Cremers C.W.R.J. (Nijmegen) 
Smith R.J.H. (Iowa City, Iowa) 
XIV + 248 p., 79 fig., 23 tab., hard cover, 2002
Status: available   
ISBN: 978-3-8055-7449-5
e-ISBN: 978-3-318-00870-8