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Original Article

The Response of Adult Orang-Utans to Flanged Male Long Calls: Inferences about Their Function

Mitra Setia T.a, b · van Schaik C.P.c

Author affiliations

aFakultas Biology, Universitas Nasional, Jakarta, Indonesia; bBehavioral Biology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; cAnthropologisches Institut, Zürich, Switzerland

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Folia Primatol 2007;78:215–226

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: April 14, 2005
Accepted: September 28, 2006
Published online: May 09, 2007
Issue release date: August 2007

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR

Abstract

Flanged male orang-utans emit loud vocalizations called long calls. In this study, we examined the correlates of variation in long-calling rates among flanged male Sumatran orang-utans, as well as the ranging responses of adult females and flanged males to these long calls. Males that gave calls more often were more likely to approach calls by others. Results bolster a female attraction function of long calls. Flanged males did not significantly avoid or approach long calls. However, males called more when alone than when guarding a female mate, and adult females significantly approached long calls, especially those of the dominant male, and did so regardless of their reproductive state, allowing them to remain within earshot of calling males. The possible selective advantages of this response include avoidance of harassment and infanticide by males. These findings confirm the existence of some form of social organization above the mother-infant unit.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Article

Received: April 14, 2005
Accepted: September 28, 2006
Published online: May 09, 2007
Issue release date: August 2007

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 3
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0015-5713 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9980 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/FPR


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