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Original Paper

Leukocyte Count and Vascular Risk in Symptomatic Intracranial Atherosclerosis

Ovbiagele B.a · Lynn M.J.b · Saver J.L.a · Chimowitz M.I.c

Author affiliations

aStroke Center and Department of Neurology, UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, Calif., bDepartment of Biostatistics, Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University, and cDepartment of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Ga., USA

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Cerebrovasc Dis 2007;24:283–288

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: November 28, 2006
Accepted: March 17, 2007
Published online: July 17, 2007
Issue release date: August 2007

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CED

Abstract

Background: Few data exist about the prognostic value of serum white blood cell (WBC) count among patients with symptomatic cerebrovascular disease. We investigated the relationship between WBC count and vascular risk in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease enrolled in the Warfarin-Aspirin Symptomatic Intracranial Disease(WASID) study. Methods: The relationships between baseline serum WBC count (categorized into quartiles) and both ischemic stroke alone and the combined endpoint of ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction or vascular death were evaluated using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: Compared with the quartile with the lowest WBC counts at baseline (≤5.9 × 109/l), WASID subjects in both upper WBC quartiles (7.3–8.8; ≧8.9 × 109/l) were more likely to be younger (p = 0.022), diabetic (p = 0.013), on statin treatment (p = 0.015), or have higher mean body mass index (p = 0.015) and triglyceride (p = 0.0065) values. The rate of the primary endpoint was greater among WASID subjects in the upper two WBC quartiles compared with the lower two quartiles (28 vs. 16%, hazard ratio = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.2–2.5, p = 0.003). After adjusting for baseline factors found to be significantly related to the time of primary endpoint in multivariate analysis, both upper WBC quartiles (vs. lowest quartile) were independently associated with a greater risk for the primary endpoint (hazard ratio of 1.5; 95% CI = 1.06–2.2, p = 0.024). Conclusions: An elevated WBC count at study entry was associated with an increased risk of stroke and vascular death in patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease enrolled in the WASID trial.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: November 28, 2006
Accepted: March 17, 2007
Published online: July 17, 2007
Issue release date: August 2007

Number of Print Pages: 6
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 2

ISSN: 1015-9770 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9786 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CED


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