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Appetite and Energy Balance

Diet-Derived Nutrients Modulate the Effects of Amylin on c-Fos Expression in the Area Postrema and on Food Intake

Michel S. · Becskei C. · Erguven E. · Lutz T.A. · Riediger T.

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Institute of Veterinary Physiology, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland

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Neuroendocrinology 2007;86:124–135

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Appetite and Energy Balance

Published online: August 16, 2007
Issue release date: September 2007

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 9
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN

Abstract

The pancreatic hormone amylin decreases food intake via activation of area postrema (AP) neurons. We investigated whether amylin’s potency to reduce food intake and to induce c-Fos expression in the AP/nucleus of the solitary tract region is affected by the feeding conditions and specifically by the macronutrient composition of the diet. Whereas a low dose of amylin (5 µg/kg s.c.) induced very little c-Fos expression in ad libitum chow fed rats, it caused a strong c-Fos expression in 24-hour food-deprived rats and in rats that received a nutrient-deficient non-caloric mash (NCM; vanilla-flavoured cellulose) 24 h before injection. To reveal the contribution of single nutrients to the low c-Fos expression after chow feeding, amylin-induced c-Fos was analyzed after feeding NCM that was selectively supplemented with glucose, fat (lard), or protein (casein), matching the intake of these nutrients of chow-fed rats. While the rats fed NCM supplemented with glucose or fat displayed an equally strong amylin-induced activation as fasted rats or rats fed plain NCM, a significantly lower c-Fos expression was observed in rats fed a protein-supplemented NCM or a NCM containing all three nutrients. In line with this lower activation, the same dose of amylin failed to reduce food intake in NCM/protein-fed rats, while amylin caused a reduction in feeding when animals received NCM, NCM/glucose, or NCM/fat. Interestingly, amylin effectively reduced food intake in ad libitum chow fed rats despite the low level of amylin-induced c-Fos expression in the AP under these conditions. We conclude that the anorectic potential of amylin may be attenuated by diet-derived proteins, whereas this effect appears to be overridden when the amount of carbohydrates/fat is high relative to the protein content, such as, e.g., in standard chow.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Appetite and Energy Balance

Published online: August 16, 2007
Issue release date: September 2007

Number of Print Pages: 12
Number of Figures: 9
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 0028-3835 (Print)
eISSN: 1423-0194 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/NEN


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