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Original Paper

Influence of Dietary Fat and Zinc Supplementation on the Iron Utilization in Growing Rats

Boesch-Saadatmandi C.b · Most E.a · Weigand E.a

Author affiliations

aInstitute of Animal Nutrition and Nutritional Physiology, University of Giessen, Giessen, and bInstitute of Human Nutrition and Food Science, University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany

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Ann Nutr Metab 2007;51:395–401

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: June 09, 2006
Accepted: April 28, 2007
Published online: September 12, 2007
Issue release date: December 2007

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ANM

Abstract

Background/Aims: There is increasing evidence that the amount and type of dietary fat may modify the utilization of the trace element iron. The present study investigated the effect of high amounts of fat of different origin at marginal and high dietary zinc supply on the iron utilization. Methods: Growing male rats, assigned to 1 of 6 groups of 8 animals each were fed diets that contained either 7 or 100 µg zinc/g. These diets were enriched with 0 or 22% fat as beef tallow (BT) or as sunflower oil (SO) above the basal level of 3% soybean oil. Iron was added as ferrous sulfate at 60 µg/g of diet. Results: The apparent iron absorption was markedly lower in the case of the high-fat diets at either zinc level. The BT diets resulted in significantly higher iron concentrations in the liver compared to both the SO and control diets. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were not influenced by any of the treatments. Conclusion: Although the high-fat diets reduced iron absorption, there was no evidence for lower iron status parameters in blood and tissues. In contrast, BT as a source of saturated fatty acids markedly elevated liver iron concentrations.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: June 09, 2006
Accepted: April 28, 2007
Published online: September 12, 2007
Issue release date: December 2007

Number of Print Pages: 7
Number of Figures: 0
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 0250-6807 (Print)
eISSN: 1421-9697 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/ANM


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