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Molecular cytogenetic characterization of pancreas cancer cell lines reveals high complexity chromosomal alterations

Griffin C.A.a, b · Morsberger L.a · Hawkins A.L.a · Haddadin M.a · Patel A.a · Ried T.c · Schrock E.c · Perlman E.J.a · Jaffee E.b

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Departments of aPathology and bOncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore; cNHGRI, Bethesda, MD (USA)

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Cytogenet Genome Res 118:148–156 (2007)

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: November 22, 2007
Issue release date: November 2007

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR

Abstract

Karyotype analysis can provide clues to significant genes involved in the genesis and growth of pancreas cancer. The genome of pancreas cancer is complex, and G-band analysis cannot resolve many of the karyotypic abnormalities seen. We studied the karyotypes of 15 recently established cell lines using molecular cytogenetic tools. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis of all 15 lines identified genomic gains of 3q, 8q, 11q, 17q, and chromosome 20 in nine or more cell lines. CGH confirmed frequent loss of chromosome 18, 17p, 6q, and 8p. 14/15 cell lines demonstrated loss of chromosome 18q, either by loss of a copy of chromosome 18 (n = 5), all of 18q (n = 7) or portions of 18q (n = 2). Multicolor FISH (Spectral Karyotyping, or SKY) of 11 lines identified many complex structural chromosomal aberrations. 93 structurally abnormal chromosomes were evaluated, for which SKY added new information to 67. Several potentially site-specific recurrent rearrangements were observed. Chromosome region 18q11.2 was recurrently involved in nine cell lines, including formation of derivative chromosomes 18 from a t(18;22) (three cell lines), t(17;18) (two cell lines), and t(12;18), t(15;18), t(18;20), and ins(6;18) (one cell line each). To further define the breakpoints involved on chromosome 18, YACs from the 18q11.2 region, spanning approximately 8 Mb, were used to perform targeted FISH analyses of these lines. We found significant heterogeneity in the breakpoints despite their G-band similarity, including multiple independent regions of loss proximal to the already identified loss of DPC4 at 18q21.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Paper

Published online: November 22, 2007
Issue release date: November 2007

Number of Print Pages: 9
Number of Figures: 5
Number of Tables: 4

ISSN: 1424-8581 (Print)
eISSN: 1424-859X (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/CGR


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