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Original Paper

Spinal Bone Mineral Density, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in Children with Cerebral Palsy

Ali O.d · Shim M.c · Fowler E.b · Cohen P.a · Oppenheim W.b

Author affiliations

aDivision of Pediatric Endocrinology, Mattel Children’s Hospital, and bUCLA/Orthopedic Hospital Center for Cerebral Palsy, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, Calif.; cSouthern California Permanente Medical Group, Pasadena, Calif., and dMedical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisc., USA

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Horm Res 2007;68:316–320

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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: January 05, 2006
Accepted: October 03, 2007
Published online: October 02, 2007
Issue release date: November 2007

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1663-2818 (Print)
eISSN: 1663-2826 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HRP

Abstract

Background/Aims: Childhood cerebral palsy (CP) is associated with osteopenia and the GH-IGF axis plays an important role in bone metabolism. We studied the relationship between spinal bone mineral density (BMD) and serum IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in children with CP. Methods: Cross-sectional study of 30 children (9 F and 21 M, ages 4.5–15) with CP. Subjects underwent dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans (spinal BMD), blood tests (IGF-1, IGFBP-3, Ca, P, PTH, vitamin D, osteocalcin) and urine tests (N-telopeptide). Results: Spinal BMD was decreased in children with CP (average Z-score –2.14 ± 1.08) compared to age- and gender-matched norms. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 were also decreased compared to age-matched norms (average IGF-1 Z-score –0.74 ± 1.2, average IGFBP-3 Z-score –0.68 ± 1.2). All other blood and urine tests, including measures of calcium and vitamin D status, were normal. In 25 CP children with osteopenia (Z-score >–1), there was a trend towards correlation between spinal BMD Z-score and serum IGF-1 SDS score (r = 0.328, p = 0.09). IGFBP-3 Z-scores were available in 24 of these patients and had a statistically significant correlation with spinal BMD Z-score (r = 0.386, p = 0.05). Conclusion: Osteopenia is common in children withCP and may be associated with lower IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels.

© 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel


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Article / Publication Details

First-Page Preview
Abstract of Original Paper

Received: January 05, 2006
Accepted: October 03, 2007
Published online: October 02, 2007
Issue release date: November 2007

Number of Print Pages: 5
Number of Figures: 2
Number of Tables: 1

ISSN: 1663-2818 (Print)
eISSN: 1663-2826 (Online)

For additional information: https://www.karger.com/HRP


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